Luxury Institute News

April 28, 2015

Luxury Panel: What Millennials Want

Posted in Uncategorized

Previews Inside Out
Topic: Life & Style
April 27. 2015

When you hear the words “affluent millennial,” do you picture a 30-something tech mogul buying a trophy home in the hills of LA? Or a hashtag-happy celebrity starting a lifestyle brand? Clichés aside, millennials—more than 74 million adults ages 18 to 34 in the U.S.—are changing the luxury landscape as we know it. For our “Luxury: The Next Generation” issue, we decided to go straight to the experts—the Luxury Institute’s Milton Pedraza, Luxury Daily editor Mickey Alam Khan and Forbes’ millennial reporter Larissa Faw—to find out what this increasingly influential group really wants when it comes to luxury.

Previews Inside Out: What does the next generation of luxury consumers want from brands today?

Milton Pedraza: Across the generations, millennials, Gen Xers and boomers all want the best in design, quality and craftsmanship, along with great service.

Mickey Alam Khan: The next generation of luxury consumers want to build stronger emotional connections with brands. They not only want to experience the products in-store, but also via digital media such as online and mobile. They also want to feel good about their luxury acquisitions from an ecological standpoint. In other words, the next generation of luxury consumers want to see authenticity, digital savvy and environmental nobility from their favorite luxury brands.

Larissa Faw: The key words are “make them feel special.” They want to be the only ones able to experience that product or opportunity. The worst thing in the world is to be mass and beige. Everywhere and generic. Coach got itself into trouble because it opened up an outlet shop in every city. It became overly accessible to everyone. The worst thing for luxury buyers is when some downscale shopper has the same item. That is the kiss of death for affluent shoppers. That brand is no longer luxury.

Milton Pedraza: Hey, and also respect brand heritage! But only as long as the brand stays relevant to them.

Previews Inside Out: There was a recent survey published in Luxury Daily that found the majority of affluent consumers have a different definition of luxury than they did five years ago. What do you think the definition of luxury is today?

Mickey Alam Khan: One of the biggest changes in the last few years has been the shift in the luxury-consumption mindset from “I have” to “I experience.” So it’s gone from simply material acquisition to a collection of exquisite memories to be cherished for a long time from unique experiences. That said, as defined by Luxury Daily, luxury must have these time-proven qualities: exceptional craftsmanship and customer service, brand authenticity, limited distribution and high perceived value. That hasn’t changed.

Larissa Faw: Once upon a time, luxury meant price. You almost just knew something was a luxury product because it was insanely expensive. Now, luxury means exclusivity and authenticity. One-of-a-kind items that come from a true place. A product can be $5, but if it is the only one and rare, that is luxury.

Milton Pedraza: Today’s luxury consumers also demand demonstrated expertise, trustworthiness and generosity from the brand ambassadors. These days, they also prefer a brand with a social conscience that treats associates, clients, suppliers and the less fortunate in society like human beings. Along with the best product, that is what creates an extraordinary experience for most.

Previews Inside Out: Do you think millennials are partly responsible for this shift? How so?

Mickey Alam Khan: Yes, the millennial generation is quite responsible for the shift in luxury’s definition. This generation is digitally savvy and is responsible for the evolving approach in marketing and retailing. Presence on social media enables brands to stay connected with their younger customers and prospects, dialoguing with them in the lingua franca of the day.

Milton Pedraza: Yes, the millennials, with their more humanistic values, are influencing the business world to deliver extraordinary product innovations, but also extraordinary human empowerment with kindness.

Larissa Faw It is great that millennials have moved beyond the materialistic nature of what has been considered luxury. Many traits that typically define luxury—like fawning treatment or rich, indulgent services—are no longer acceptable or cool. Can you imagine being served by someone wearing a uniform and white gloves? I shudder at the thought.

Previews Inside Out: Beyond that, how are millennials transforming the luxury industry?

Milton Pedraza: They tend to take the design, quality, and craftsmanship and service for granted. They want customized, personalized solutions “now, now.” As Four Seasons says, “Show me you know me.”

Mickey Alam Khan: Four words would reflect the transformation in the luxury business: high touch, high tech. Millennials want that kind of experience with their brand, and so do Gen Xers and, to some extent, digitally savvy baby boomers. Luxury brands are being shepherded along a digital path where online and mobile are the start of the research process that may or may not culminate in a store sale.

Larissa Faw: They are making everyone rethink what it means to be a luxury brand. Just because you charge $5,000 for a bag does not mean you are luxury. Just because you operate a nice hotel does not mean you appeal to affluent millennials. What was once considered top-flight treatment—like that white glove treatment—does not necessarily align with younger generations. This presents opportunity, but it is also challenging, because what once worked, no longer does. You don’t earn five stars by doing what you did for decades. That said, I also think millennials take for granted a lot of what is known as luxury. Like top-sourced leather goods. They expect all brands, even discount ones, to offer that. They expect great service, like immediately tending to their demands. Those services used to separate luxury brands from regular ones.

Mickey Alam Khan: Also, for many young people, it’s not simply about flashy identification with a lifestyle or a product, but a reflection of their values. Hence, the importance of storytelling and codes for luxury brand and luxury retailers to get their message across.

Previews Inside Out: Let’s talk more about this push toward authenticity in luxury, which is an important value for many millennials. In what areas of the marketplace have you seen authenticity play out most dramatically?

Milton Pedraza: They require authenticity across the board. But let’s face it—many product offerings are copycats and commodities, even in some luxury circles. So the authenticity is more about the founders, the brand purpose, the brand ambassadors and “how” they do what they do.

Mickey Alam Khan: I’d say authenticity continues to play a key role in leather goods and accessories. Look at Hermès. While other luxury brands such as Gucci are suffering from logo fatigue and endless line extensions, Hermès continues to post above-industry growth. What does Hermès do differently that attracts all generations to its brand? Attention to quality, to its codes, to its heritage, to its line of products. Its messaging is consistent. The equestrian and travel themes are embedded in most ads. And, most of all, the product standards have been maintained over the decades. Hermès is France at its best, and that’s what millennials and other consumers are buying. Pedigree continues to matter to millennials.

Larissa Faw: Fashion and watch brands are really overplaying their histories and design backstories in order to capture that authentic hook. Upscale alcohol brands are also trying too hard. I don’t need to see another old-timer posing with his dog on a farm to tell me a brand is authentic—and that this makes it okay to charge $300, since it has been aged in a barrel for 100 years. This authenticity does matter to millennials, but I see it becoming too commonplace.

Previews Inside Out: Can you identify any luxury brands you think are already starting to make this adjustment in their marketing? You know—moving away from exclusivity to authenticity.

Mickey Alam Khan: Well, let me just point out that exclusivity and authenticity can’t be mutually exclusive. You have to have both to survive long term as a luxury brand.

Milton Pedraza: Bottega Veneta is a prime example of expertise, trust and generosity with all constituents. And they have the numbers to prove it. Burberry is there, too. We see Van Cleef & Arpels moving in that direction. Sephora, too.

Previews Inside Out: Why are some of the top luxury brands a bit stalled today?

Milton Pedraza: Their products are too common, too logoed, and they have disengaged brand ambassadors. So the customers become disengaged, too. The brands have become passive transactors rather than humanistic relationship builders.

Mickey Alam Khan: Gucci comes to mind for me. It’s had some turbulence over senior talent most recently with the departure of the CEO and creative director. While the successors are in place, what Gucci needs to do is rethink its positioning. It’s become rather common, which is the kiss of death for a luxury brand. If too many people have access to the product, it loses its allure. I foresee something similar with Louis Vuitton. Way too many people sport its handbags, thus diluting its exclusivity. It’ll end up catering mostly to aspirational consumers and risk alienating those with serious money. It pays to be slightly discrete in luxury. I know Louis Vuitton is working to scale back on plastering its logo everywhere. The wink-and-nod in luxury should be the styling that those in the know are aware of.

Larissa Faw: Millennials are like cats. If you try too hard, they don’t want anything to do with you. I know Honda isn’t a luxury brand, but its recent commercials featuring top toys from the 80s—like Strawberry Shortcake and Skeletor from He-Man—speaking to the camera to try to sell me a car were pathetic in how hard they were trying to appeal to millennials. My mom had no idea who that skeleton-looking toy was, since these toys were totally millennial-centric, but both my sister and I knew immediately. No one likes a desperate brand that is obvious with its advertising. Pretentiousness is another reason brands are toxic to millennials. Jewelry brands that continue to embrace that silly fairy-tale engagement proposal turn off a lot of millennials. That isn’t how our world looks, and we don’t want any part of it.

Previews Inside Out: When you look at the luxury market as a whole—travel, auto companies, fashion, jewelry—where are you seeing the most innovation when it comes to imparting authentic experiences?

Larissa Faw: I recently saw an ad for a jewelry brand that lets people create their own rings. That is exactly what it takes to reach millennials. Who wants a ring that his or her nemesis in high school might have? Everyone wants to brag he or she has the only one of something. Any company that is able to develop customized and personalized experiences will win them over.

Milton Pedraza: Electronics are the obvious answer. But since technology is invading every space, we see autos, apparel, accessories and really all luxury categories using technology online, in-store and after the sales to enhance the client experience and build a long-term relationship. The most interesting innovations, however, will come from empowering and enhancing the brand ambassadors to build human relationships with their clients. No algorithm can replace a powerful and kind human relationship.

Mickey Alam Khan: There is digital innovation across luxury sectors. Some of it is consumer-led, and some of it brand-driven. Travel and hospitality is a leader in the space. The sites, apps and social media are nonpareil—as are the unique culinary experiences, meet-and-greets with famous chefs and tours in the vicinity of hotel properties that respect the land and traditions. Fashion is also a leader in authenticity. See the abundance of live streams of runway shows that deliver the live experience to the desktop, lap or palm.

Previews Inside Out: In terms of real estate, where do you think the industry needs to move in order to cater to more affluent millennials?

Larissa Faw: Good question. The industry needs to make them feel special, by offering services that understand their life stage. For instance, maybe arrange for Uber accounts so they can have private car services. I recommend taking a page from luxury hotel brands and how they cater to them with dry cleaning, maid services, food delivery. If you come at millennials with the mindset to make them feel special, you can’t go wrong.

Mickey Alam Khan: I’d say real estate needs more digital moxie. Not just PC sites or mobile-friendly versions, but better social media and app executions. Younger luxury consumers are researching on tablets and smartphones, and real estate’s presence on those devices can be improved.

Milton Pedraza: Empower the agent through technology, data and coaching to enhance the client. Real estate is not a game of bricks and mortar; it is a game of hearts and minds.

February 20, 2015

Can Kate Spade Recover From Closing Its 2 Spin-Off Brands?

Seeking Alpha
By: Eryn Johnson
February 18, 2015

Kate Spade & Company (NYSE:KATE) designs and markets branded women’s and men’s apparel, accessories, and fragrance products. The company’s portfolio of brands includes most apparel and non-apparel categories, and their products are available at retail locations throughout the world, including its own retail and outlet stores, and on its e-commerce sites. The company operates the Kate Spade New York brand as well as the Jack Spade brand, since closing Kate Spade Saturday. The company has a very competent management team, including CEO and board member Craig Leavitt, who has been CEO since 2010; COO George Carrara, former CFO of Tommy Hilfiger and Liz Claiborne; and CFO Thomas Linko, who has been with the company since October 2014 after being CFO/COO of Juicy Couture Inc.

According to the Kate Spade investor relations site, the brand “inspires women to live colorfully, delivering on our promise to help her lead a more interesting life. In every time zone and on every continent, kate spade new york is a global lifestyle brand offering aspirational luxury with a clever wit and playful charm that is distinctly our own.” The site also explains that Jack Spade “grew out of the simple idea that useful products could also be stylish. Jack Spade understands that taste and style say more about someone than fashion or trends. As a brand it stands for smart designs and ideas to help men live a layered life, and speaks to an expanding collection of discerning customers in the U.S., with a small but burgeoning business abroad.”

Click the link to read the entire article (subscription required) which includes quotes from Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute: http://seekingalpha.com/article/2926306-can-kate-spade-recover-from-closing-its-2-spin-off-brands

January 22, 2015

Luxury Institute Analysis Shows Strong Potential for Firms Serving Wealthy Consumers as Ranks of High-Income Americans Swell to All-Time High

Marketwired
January 21, 2015
By: Luxury Institute

A surge in the number of high-income households signals a source of potential strength for firms selling high-end goods and services, according to a metadata analysis of the Federal Reserve’s 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances by the New York-based Luxury Institute. The number of U.S. families earning at least $150,000 has grown 25% from 10.6 million households in 2010 to 12.8 million 2013, but even as more Americans achieve “high-income” status, luxury merchants still face challenges in turning these high-earners into loyal customers.

Favorable trends in household finances, since 2010, have thus far failed to produce a broad-based rebound in luxury on par with the boom before the Great Recession. Despite rising levels of income, wealth, and recoveries in stocks and real estate to pre-recession levels, many providers of high-end goods and services continue to struggle with sales growth more than six years after the financial crisis that devastated asset values and consumer confidence.

Long memories of the crisis are partly to blame for restrained spending: 30% of consumers from households with at least $150,000 in annual income say that they spend more when their assets appreciate in value, but the wealth effect cuts both ways, and even more deeply when asset values decline. Two-thirds of high-income Americans say that when the value of what they own goes down so does their spending.

In addition, luxury marketers are also facing fundamental shifts in consumer shopping habits brought on by the ubiquity of tablets and smart phones, and the influence of social media.

“Compelling products and extraordinary experiences lead to long-term client relationships in luxury,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Firms thriving today are those with systems and personnel in place to leverage new technologies into smarter ways of communicating and doing business with customers that reflect the new reality.”

Conducted every three years since 1983, the Survey of Consumer Finances provides detailed demographic profiles and insights into household wealth, income, saving, and spending. Since 2004, the Luxury Institute has mined the survey data to identify emerging trends that can impact companies serving a wealthy clientele.

Source: http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/luxury-institute-analysis-shows-strong-potential-firms-serving-wealthy-consumers-as-1985040.htm

December 29, 2014

Luxury Brands Often Misidentify Their Target Consumers

MediaPost Communications
December 26, 2014
By: Steve McClellan

Luxury brands lose 50% of their top customers annually because they routinely misidentify their demographic and economic profile while also failing to create a personalized sales experience for them, according to new research from global marketing and crm agency Epsilon and research and consulting firm The Luxury Institute.

Epsilon analyzed and compared 30,000 luxury shoppers to uncover insights, myths and stereotypes of the luxury shopper, the firm said.

According to the findings, luxury brands mistakenly believe their customers are typically female and on average 45-years old with a net worth over $1 million. However, 57.5% of luxury spenders are in fact male. They are likely to be of Asian and Middle-Eastern descent with a net worth over $500,000. In addition, nearly 13.8% of shoppers with a net worth over $1 million invest mostly in modern, contemporary decor and gifts as opposed to high-ticket apparel items.

“Luxury brands need to truly understand who their customers are and what they are looking for in a luxe shopping experience,” said Jean-Yves Sabot, vice president, retail business development at Epsilon. “This is critical in creating a personalized experience for the customer that drives engagement, retention and satisfaction.”

The report categorizes luxury shoppers into four groups including the so-called “True Luxe” shopper who has the means to purchase luxury items at will without financial concern. But there is also the “Aspirational Shopper,” described as shoppers who “desire to own pieces from a brand, but may not have the means to do so on a regular basis.”

Another group is labeled “Moments of Wealth,” comprised of shoppers that may save for specific piece but do not purchase from the brand frequently. And the “Dressed for the Part” group buys luxury items to give the appearance of someone who lives a luxury lifestyle but often does not have the financial resources to be a true luxury buyer.

The study also found that online shopping accounts for less than a quarter of sales for multichannel luxury retail brands, because these consumers typically want to see and touch the product. While 98% of luxury shoppers use the Internet regularly, more than 50% of the time they are researching products and comparing prices on their mobile devices.

Luxury shoppers “crave the experience of the brand and look for a VIP interaction,”  according to the report.

Recommendations include using insights to tailor marketing communication to the optimal targets for more personalized and relevant communication. Luxury brands also need to do a better job of leveraging external shopper behavior for true one-on-one interaction both in-store and online, the report surmises. They also need to get a complete picture of their consumer target set. Third-party data will help. More on the report can be found here.

Source: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/240785/luxury-brands-often-misidentify-their-target-consu.html

The Average Luxury Shopper May Surprise You

The Wall Street Journal
December 24, 2014
By: Nathalie Tadena

The average luxury shopper doesn’t look like a Real Housewife of Beverly Hills.

According to a report from marketing agency Epsilon and boutique research and consulting firm Luxury Institute, a true luxury shopper — one that has the financial means to purchase high-end items frequently throughout the year  – is most likely to be an Asian or Middle Eastern single man between the ages of 25 years and 44 years old,  with no children.

Luxury brands have traditionally pitched their products to women over the age of 45 with a net worth more than $1 million, so many have apparently been failing to engage their best customers. Half of luxury brands lose 50% of their top customers every year, the report said.

The study compared the top 30,000 luxury spenders with a yearly spend over $30,000 in specialty retail and average transactions of over $1,200 to the shopping patterns and profiles of individuals with a net worth of more than $1 million and financial resources over $2 million.

According to the research, there are four types of shoppers who buy luxury goods. The “Aspirational Shopper” desires to own pieces from a luxury brand but doesn’t have the means to do so on a regular basis and might turn to an outlet or discount boutique like Rue La La to buy from a luxury brand. The “Moments of Wealth” shopper saves for a specific luxury piece, but doesn’t buy from that luxury brand frequently. The “Dressed for the Part” shopper purchases high-end items but doesn’t have the financial resources to be a true luxury buyer.  The” True Luxe” shopper — a luxury retailer’s best customer — has the financial means to purchase high-end items and purchases from luxury brands frequently throughout the year.

Nearly 60% of these True Luxe shoppers are male and more than half are single, the report found. The True Luxe shopper also has a net worth of more than $500,000.

Luxury shoppers prefer to shop in stores, where they can get VIP treatment from a salesperson and touch and see products in person, the study said.  Online shopping represents less than a quarter of sales for multi-channel luxury retail brands.

A rude or inattentive salesperson is the biggest reason that a consumer won’t come back to a particular luxury brand, said Luxury Institute Chief Executive Milton Pedraza. Only 10% to 15% of luxury customers said they have a first-name relationship with a sales professional, according to the report.

Brands that use information about an individual consumer’s buying habits and preferences during in-store visits can create a stronger buying relationship, the researchers said.

Source: http://blogs.wsj.com/cmo/2014/12/24/the-average-luxury-shopper-may-surprise-you/ 

December 1, 2014

Marketer of the Year: Stuart Weitzman

By: Irene Park
Women’s Wear Daily
December 1, 2014

Click on the link to read the entire article (subscription required): http://www.wwd.com/footwear-news/markets/marketer-of-the-year-stuart-weitzman-8049600?gnewsid=a161467a3da489b5897b97c969ca7fb8

October 30, 2014

October 1, 2014

Coldwell Banker Previews International Luxury Market Report Reveals Newcomers On List Of Hottest U.S. Cities For Luxury Home Sales

PR Newswire
October 1, 2014
High Net-Worth Consumer Survey Reveals Dramatic Gender Gaps
MADISON, N.J.Oct. 1, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Quiet, unassuming areas adjacent to traditional luxury markets have rapidly transformed into hotbeds of luxury real estate in the 12-month period from July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014.  Leading the way and making its debut in the top 5 U.S. luxury markets for homes valued at $1 million+ is San Jose, where high-end home sales are up a staggering 76% from this time last year, according to the Luxury Market Report prepared by the Coldwell Banker Previews International® marketing program. With Silicon Valley luxury real estate on fire, the affluent enclave of Atherton doubled its sales in the $10 million+ range from 2013. Burlingame, located approximately a mile from Hillsborough in Northern California emerged in the $10 million+ list for sold homes for the first time, most likely as the result of low inventory in the Bay Area’s most sought-after ZIP codes. Adjacency is a powerful trend playing out in high-demand luxury cities well beyond Silicon Valley and the Bay Area, notably in Miami.North Miami Beach made its debut among the top 20 cities for $10 million+ homes sold —signaling that luxury buyers are expanding their horizons beyond the typical hotspots of Miami Beach, South Beach and the private communities of Star and Fisher Islands. Overall, San Francisco led the nation with the highest number of sales in the $1 million+ category—up nearly 57% from this time last year. During the last 12 months through June 2014, the top five U.S. cities with the highest number of luxury home sales valued at $1 million+ are:

Coldwell Banker Previews International Luxury Market Report

Ranking

City

State

Number of Home Sales Valued at $1 million+

1

San Francisco

Calif.

2,485

2

Los Angeles

Calif.

2,170

3

New York

N.Y.

2,145

4

San Jose

Calif.

1,119

5

Houston

Texas

981

6

Chicago

Ill.

972

7

Naples

Fla.

964

8

Miami

Fla.

933

9

San Diego

Calif.

927

10

Washington

DC

878

The number of sales for four out of five of these top cities is up by at least 36%. Extending the range up to the $10 million+ category, Miami Beach and Aspen have another strong showing against long standing luxury real estate epicenters New York and Beverly Hills.

Coldwell Banker Previews International Luxury Market Report

Ranking

City

State

Number of Home Sales Valued at $10 million+

1

New York

N.Y.

58

2

Beverly Hills

Calif.

28

3

Los Angeles

Calif.

25

4

Miami Beach

Fla.

17

5

Aspen

Colo.

16

6 (tie)

Greenwich

Conn.

14

6 (tie)

Atherton

Calif.

14

7

Santa Barbara

Calif.

10

8

Malibu

Calif.

8

9

Palm Beach

Fla.

7

10 (tie)

Laguna Beach

Calif.

6

10 (tie)

Kailua Kona

Hawaii

6

10 (tie)

Naples

Fla.

6

10 (tie)

San Francisco

Calif.

6

HIGH-NET-WORTH CONSUMER SURVEY The U.S. high-end residential real estate market remains strong, with nearly half (48%) of all wealthy consumers indicating that they plan to purchase a luxury home within the next 12 months, according to the companion survey of wealthy U.S. consumers with a net worth of at least $5 million (penta-millionaires) conducted by the Coldwell Banker Previews International® program and the Luxury Institute.  Younger buyers are by far the most highly motivated to purchase:  An overwhelming 81% of affluent individuals under 35 plan to buy a luxury home in the next year. The survey reveals dramatic generational differences:

  • Penta-millionaires 35 and under reported the highest average purchase price of all age groups - $7.8 million – and have the largest percentage (80%) of all age groups paying all-cash.
  • By stark contrast, wealthy buyers 45-64 paid an average of $2.7 million for their most recent home purchase while buyers 65 and older spent just $1 million.

The report brought to light strong gender gaps:

  • 70% of women reported paying all-cash for their most recent property vs. 57% of men.
  • Women reported buying more expensive homes than men:
    • 22% of women spent $10 million or more for their most recent property vs. 13% of men in the same wealth bracket.
  • 46% of women have plans to buy another home in the coming year, up from 31% in 2013.

Location, location, location may no longer be the golden rule of real estate:

  • With the ability to work remotely now a reality for many, only 25% of the under-35 age group indicate that location dominates their search criteria.
  • Instead, 75% say that lifestyle considerations are the No. 1 factor driving their choice of which home to buy.
  • As evidence of this powerful generational shift, 86% of buyers 65 and older say that location remains their top priority.  

Hottest In-Demand Amenities:

  • Nearly one-third of all wealthy buyers under the age of 45 count a “green” or “LEED certified” home as more important than it was 3 years ago.
  • The trend is also catching on among wealthy buyers of all ages, with 21% saying that they want to buy an eco-friendly home, up from a mere 7% in 2013.
  • As homes become increasingly high-tech, 25% now consider a fully automated home a priority.
  • 37% of respondents under age 35 and 30% of those with a net worth exceeding $10 million will prioritize safe rooms in their next homes.

The full list of the Top 20 Best Performing U.S. Cities in Luxury Real Estate by price points of $1 million+, $5 million+ and $10 million+, and the high-net-worth consumer survey results can be viewed here www.previewslmr.com. About Coldwell Banker Previews International® The Coldwell Banker Previews International program has been a world leader in the marketing of luxury homes since 1933. The Previews® program was acquired by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC in 1980 and re-launched as Coldwell Banker Previews International, the brand’s luxury homes program.  The exclusive group of certified Previews Property Specialists make up approximately 8.5 percent of the Coldwell Banker sales associates worldwide.  Coldwell Banker Previews International participated in more than 20,000 transaction sides of homes priced at $1 million or more in 2013. On average, Previews handles $102.7 million in luxury homes sales every day. Coldwell Banker, Previews and Coldwell Banker Previews International are registered marks licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Each office is independently owned and operated. Sales associates affiliated with Coldwell Banker offices are independent contractors. About Coldwell Banker® Since 1906, the Coldwell Banker® organization has been a premier provider of full-service residential and commercial real estate. Coldwell Banker is the oldest national real estate brand in the United States and today has a network of approximately 84,200 independent sales associates affiliated with more than 3,100 offices in 48 countries and territories. The Coldwell Banker brand is known for creating innovative consumer services as recently seen by being the first national real estate brand with an iPad app, the first to augment its website www.coldwellbanker.com for smart phones, the first to create a iPhone application with international listings and the first to fully harness the power of video in real estate listings, news and information through its Coldwell Banker On LocationSMYouTube channel.  The Coldwell Banker System is a leader in niche markets such as resort, new homes and luxury properties through its Coldwell Banker Previews International® marketing program.  Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act.  Each office is independently owned and operated. Coldwell Banker is a subsidiary of Realogy Holdings Corp. (NYSE: RLGY), a global leader in real estate franchising and provider of real estate brokerage, relocation and settlement services. Methodology Manhattan area active listing data has been gathered from the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY). Not all Manhattan area real estate brokerage firms make Information about their property listings available to any cooperative resource, including REBNY.  Manhattan area sales data has been gathered from REBNY and from StreetEasy.com, an online consumer and private industry portal that reports closed real estate transactions from REBNY as well as other reporting brokerage resources. Not all Manhattan area real estate brokerage firms report their closed sales to any cooperative resource, including StreetEasy.com and / or REBNY. All other data has been gathered from the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) databases known or believed to be the primary real estate broker cooperative resources for each market referenced in the report. All closed sales activity reported is for the annual period July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014. Closed sales reported to the MLS significantly later than this analysis period will not be included. All active status listing records were downloaded and processed to the same standards, and on various dates, during the months of July and August, 2014. Property specific listing and sales records were standardized to USPS address city and ZIP Code, inaccurate list and sale prices were corrected when necessary, and all duplicate records were manually excluded. As a result, statistics available via the source data providers may not correlate to this analysis. While all results are believed to be highly accurate, MLS systems do not report all real estate activity in their primary marketplace, and there may have been property transfers not included in this analysis. Copyright © 2014, Real Data Strategies, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed for the exclusive use of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. The Luxury Institute, in partnership with the Coldwell Banker Previews International® program, conducted research on the topic of real estate during Quarter 2, 2014. This in-depth survey includes responses from 506 ultra-wealthy male and female consumers in the United States. Respondents were recruited and screened to only include those age 21 or older with a minimum gross annual household income of $200,000 and a minimum net worth of $5 million.

SOURCE Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC

Media Inquiries:

Athena Snow

Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC

973.407.5590

Athena.Snow@coldwellbanker.com

Holly Taylor

Rogers and Cowan for Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC

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SOURCE Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC RELATED LINKS http://www.coldwellbanker.com http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/coldwell-banker-previews-international-luxury-market-report-reveals-newcomers-on-list-of-hottest-us-cities-for-luxury-home-sales-277723761.html

February 27, 2014

Handset Makers Go Big on Smartphones

By Brian X. Chen
New York Times
February 26, 2014

BARCELONA, Spain — Smartphones are going against one of the long-held rules in portable electronics, that smaller is better.

Year by year, computers, storage devices and music players have shed size and weight. And for decades, it has been happening with cellphones, too.

But now cellphones, and smartphones in particular, are going the way of the television: They just keep getting bigger and bigger. And people keep buying them.

The trend became even more apparent this week, as handset makers introduced a number of big-screen smartphones — from five diagonal inches to more than seven inches — at the Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona, Spain.

Click the link to read the entire article which includes a quote from Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/technology/handset-makers-go-big-on-smartphones.html?hpw&rref=fashion

June 7, 2013

Wealthy Will Spend Less on Jewelry for Rest of Year, Survey Finds

Posted in Uncategorized

A new survey predicts that high-end jewelry “may be under some pressure” for the rest of 2013, with 25 percent of affluent consumers saying they plan to spend less on that category.

By Rob Bates
JCK Magazine
June 2013 Issue

The survey by the New York City-based Luxury Institute polled consumers with a net worth of at least $5 million and minimum annual household income of $200,000.

The survey also found that spending on handbags was projected to fall, with ultra-wealthy respondents preferring to spend on travel, dining, and wine.

“They are definitely going to the ‘experential’ categories,” Luxury Institute president Milton Pedraza tells JCK. “Travel is healthy, technology is healthy.”

Pedraza believes the “economy is not as healthy as people think.”

“Even though real estate is robust and the stock market is robust, there is a lot of uncertainty out there,” he says. “There is some pent-up demand, but also a lot of caution.”

http://www.jckonline.com/2013/06/06/wealthy-will-spend-less-on-jewelry-rest-year-survey-finds

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