Luxury Institute News

August 4, 2016

Chanel most reputable brand despite low sentiment: report

Luxury Daily
By: Forrest Cardamenis
August 3, 2016

French fashion label Chanel has edged out Louis Vuitton as the most reputable brand, according to a global analysis performed by Brandwatch Analytics.

Chanel scored 396 points out of a possible 500, edging out Louis Vuitton by a mere four points and Dior by 15. The brand’s extraordinary visibility and engagement on multiple platforms and the corresponding growth of its online following helped give it the narrow victory.

“A brand’s reputation will undoubtedly have an effect on revenue and growth,” said James Lovejoy, content and research manager at Brandwatch. “Yet drawing statistically significant relationships between online conversations and revenue is notoriously challenging because there are so many various elements at play. 

“That said, our Brandwatch Social Index clearly places some of the highest grossing companies at the top: Chanel, Louis Vuitton and Dior,” he said. “Companies should consider what role they want to play online and how their social brand will affect sales, but hardline statements indicating a causal relationship between social media and overall revenue are not yet a reality.”

Looking at data from Q2 2016, “Luxury Fashion Social Index” scored 34 brands in the categories of social visibility, general visibility, net sentiment, reach growth and engagement/content, summing the scores to determine overall brand reputation.

Reputable source
In both general visibility and reach growth, Chanel scored a perfect 100, with Gucci following in general visibility at 93 and Burberry scoring an impressive 99 on reach growth. Chanel’s 91 in social visibility was good for third, behind Dior’s 97 and Louis Vuitton’s perfect score.

While social visibility measured a brand’s presence across social media channels, general visibility referred to conversation generated in news outlets, blogs and forums.

Chanel campaigns often appeal to consumers to engage or participate with the brand in more interactive ways.

Chanel Allure Homme Sport landing
Chanel Allure Homme Sport

For example, in June the atelier encouraged adventurous and active males to dive, glide and slide in a push for its Allure Homme Sport fragrances.

The fragrance campaign encourages men to “own the experience” through the use of 360-degree videos housed on its Web site as well as its branded YouTube channel. With limited product offerings for male consumers, Chanel must capture the spirit of its intended consumers in a relatable way, playing to interests rather than its brand infamy (see story).

Interestingly, Chanel scored only 31 points in net sentiment, which measured the ratio of positive to negative statements made online about the brand. Gucci also scored a 31, and only Rolex, with 30 points, was lower.

One possibility is that these brands’ historic standing and name recognition makes them a lightning rod for irate customers to air their grievances.

Gucci cruise campaign 465
Gucci cruise campaign

Gucci did come under criticism from Britain’s Advertising Standards Authority in April for an ad that was determined to depict and unhealthily thin model (see story) and also drew up controversy in Hong Kong for a misunderstanding related to local funeral rituals (see story).

On the other hand controversy from the first quarter related to animal cruelty (see story) did not appear to impact Prada and Hermès, who were in the middle of the pack.

Similarly, Rolex, Chanel and other low scorers such as Breitling, Givenchy and Burberry were not embroidered in major controversies but scored low.

On the flip side, Cartier’s 100 blew away second place Versace, which scored 70. It is further worth noting that 25 of the 34 brands had scores of 40 or lower, and only five scored more than 50, suggesting that the transparency the Internet provides also can create negative discourse around a brand.

Cartier Snakewood Amulette Instagram post

Additionally, a low score does not necessarily mean overwhelmingly negative response online.

Tying sentiment or mood to a single metric or numerical value is notoriously difficult,” Mr. Lovejoy said. “To really understand what’s happening, businesses will need to parse and measure individual topics that drive negative and positive conversations. 

“Ignoring neutral conversations, positive conversations surrounding Cartier outweighed negative ones 99.3 to 0.7 on Twitter,” he said. “Meanwhile, the Twitter conversation around Chanel was 93.2 percent positive and 6.8 percent negative. While this study looked at sentiment beyond Twitter, it’s clear that the difference isn’t actually that significant.”

“People who discuss these brands are generally positive, so when a handful of customers do have something negative to say the effect is greater. In a brief survey of Chanel, there are some complaints regarding customer service and price. While Chanel may be able to work on its customer service experience, its iconic name and exclusive price tag may always draw some level of criticism.”

Engagement and content was also a blowout, with Chanel’s second place score, a 74, trailing Ted Baker’s 100. Louis Vuitton and Dior followed with 68, and Rolex was fifth with a 65.

Rounding out the top 10 after Chanel, Louis Vuitton and Dior were Cartier, Tiffany & Co., Versace, Christian Louboutin, Prada and Michael Kors and Ted Baker. The lowest scorers – Lanvin, Dsquared2, Bottega Veneta, Kenzo and Salvatore Ferragamo – were sunk primarily by extremely low engagement scores.

Social engagement
While Brandwatch’s index helps to gauge overall market reputation, the popularity of a widely bought brand does not always sync with consumers’ perception of its value and luxury credentials, according to a survey by the Luxury Institute from earlier this year.

For its Luxury Brand Status Index series, Luxury Institute surveyed affluent women from seven of the world’s wealthiest nations to gain insights on which brands hold the most clout in terms of quality, exclusivity, social status and overall ownership. Consumer opinion is tied to whether one feels the asking price of a premium product is worth it, and it correlates directly to the brand’s perceived value among frequent and aspiring shoppers.

Despite the differences, Chanel, Louis Vuitton and Dior rank highly by either measure. Affluent women ranked Chanel and French leather goods maker Hermès as the two fashion houses most worth their premium asking prices, followed by Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton and Prada (see story).

louis vuitton.cruise 2016
Louis Vuitton Cruise 2016

By contrast, Hermès ranked 18th in Brandwatch’s index, owing to low social visibility and accompanying low engagement.

Online conversation around brands is driven almost entirely by consumers. Many brands, however, still keep a barrier between themselves and consumers, forgoing social media’s natural tendencies in favor of staying visible without compromising aspiration.

A Brandwatch report from last year shows that despite boasting immense followings, a large percentage of luxury fashion brands are surprisingly inactive on social media.

Brandwatch’s “Social Insights on the Luxury Fashion Industry” report has discovered that although a brand may place well by adopting social media, they are only scratching the surface of the opportunities available by mining social intelligence data. Luxury brands are often seen as latecomers in terms of embracing social and digital channels, but by fully taking into account the insights available from social media interactions, these labels can craft high-touch service in an online setting (see story).

Amongst the top five, Louis Vuitton overtook Dior for the number two spot largely by raising its visibility scores,” Mr. Lovejoy said. “Cartier jumped from 8th to 4th due to its improved net sentiment and reach growth scores. Tiffany & Co. jumped from 7th to 5th with an increase in reach growth and a slight development in its social visibility. 

“Prada had one of the strongest improvements, moving from 18th to 8th, in large part due to strong reach growth and modest growth in social visibility and engagement and content,” he said. “This is a competitive industry; reputation is a vital part of business for luxury fashion retailers.

“It may be difficult to take some of the leaders off their top positions, but at the same brands like Prada, which jumped up 10 spots, indicate that there is still room for movement and growth,” he said.

Source: https://www.luxurydaily.com/chanel-most-reputable-brand-despite-low-sentiment-report/

March 24, 2016

Younger affluents with higher incomes more willing to pay for fine wines

Luxury Daily
By: Jen King
March 24, 2016

As a consumer’s income bracket increases, the likelihood of drinking wine once per week also rises, according to a new survey by the Luxury Institute.

The “Premium Wine Luxury Brand Status Index (LBSI)” survey found that 90 percent of affluent consumers in the United States self-identify as wine drinkers, with 58 percent drinking wine at least once per week. How often an individual indulges in a glass of wine and how much they are willing to spend on bottles is directly linked to income, insights that may provide the oenology industry an understanding on how to best market to this demographic.

“Wine is experiential. Consumers are purchasing wine at higher volumes because they enjoy the restaurant and at-home dining experiences that include a great quality wine,” said Milton Pedraza, CEO of the Luxury Institute. “Consumers will continue to spend more on experiences rather than products. Not only will they consume more wine but they will consume wine of higher quality and at a higher price.

“Wine continues to be more popular than beer or spirits, and it is acquiring a greater share in the beverage market; this trend has been evolving over the years,” he said. “Women and millennials, in particular, are consuming at a much higher rate as their buying power and connoisseurship evolves.”

The Luxury Institute’s Premium Wine Luxury Brand Status Index surveyed consumers 21 and older from households with an income of at least $150,000 a year.

Wine or reason
For the survey, affluent consumers were asked to evaluate 21 premium domestic wine brands based on the four pillars of brand value. Luxury Institute defines these pillars as superior quality, exclusivity, enhanced social status and an overall superior consumption experience.

The survey also asked participants to share which winemakers they feel are worth paying a premium price for, those they would recommend to friends and family and which wines they plan on purchasing next.

Luxury Institute found that of the 90 percent of affluents wine drinkers, 58 percent drink wine once a week, and 78 percent drink wine at least on a monthly basis. Affluent women are also more likely to be wine drinkers, with 61 percent drinking wine at least once a week compared to only 55 percent of men, who also tend to spend more on fine wine.

As consumers age, the frequency of weekly wine drinking also increases, notably after age 55, and peaks at 65 and older. Of this older demographic, 63 percent consume wine at least weekly.

Puiforcat Sommelier
Puiforcat Sommelier collection 

Similarly with age, as income rises so does the likelihood of enjoying a glass of wine during the week. Luxury Institute found that 53 percent of respondents earning less than $200,000 drink wine weekly or more frequently, with the statistic rising to 67 percent for those earning $500,000 or more in annual income.

Understandably, the price a consumer is willing to pay for bottles of wine is dependent on their income demographic. Willingness to pay for higher priced bottles increases with income and surprisingly decreases with age.

Consumers earning less than $200,000 spend $24 on average, compared to an average of $41 per bottle for those with incomes of $500,000 or more. Additionally, consumers under the age of 45 years old spend $33 on average for fine wine, but those 65 and older purchase bottles at retail stores for $23.

These averages are also dependent on occasion, with consumers typically purchasing  $28 at retail stores, $36 for a casual weekday dinner at a restaurant and $48 for weekend dining or during a special occasion of some sort.

Silversea Culinary Arts & Wine Voyages
Silversea Culinary Arts & Wine Voyages

In regard to purchasing wine at a restaurant, the survey found that seven out of eight affluent consumers do so. Twenty-eight percent do so at least once a week, with 62 percent of purchases being by the glass rather than the bottle.

The higher the income, the more likely it is that a consumer will opt for a bottle. Those with $500,000 or more in income are 63 percent more likely to buy wine by the bottle in a restaurant, spending on average $70 for special occasions and $55 for a weekday dinner.

This is much higher than the average of $48 per bottle for special occasions and $36 for weekday dining spent by affluent consumers.

It’s okay to wine a little
Recently, increased attention has been placed on the wine industry from luxury brands.

Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts, for example, is pursuing a different kind of California dreamer with its latest property.

Alongside Alcion Ventures and Bald Mountain Development, Four Seasons will open 85 guest rooms and 20 private residence villas in Napa Valley, CA in early 2018. Napa Valley’s allure to cultured luxurians makes it an obvious destination for the hotelier, which already has several California properties (see story).

Four Seasons Napa Valley
Four Seasons’ Napa Valley, CA property 

Also, Hermès-owned silver maker Puiforcat is paying homage to the ritual of wine tasting with the help of a duo of experts.

Together with sommelier Enrico Bernardo and designer Michael Anastassiades, the brand created a collection intended to bring a new experience to those who revel in the tasting or serving of the beverage. Working with external creatives helped Puiforcat go outside the expected, traditional wine glass (see story).

Winemakers should rely on experiential storytelling and outreach to pull consumers in their direction.

“Quality and experience matter tremendously,” Mr. Pedraza said. “Winemakers should use their winery and membership experiences to create a client experience that makes them feel special.

“Wine companies should also use the on-premise platform, restaurants, hotels, etc., and off-premise platform, wine and liquor stores, to deliver beyond the product and create an experience that is focused on a great quality product with a compelling story and an experience that creates a long-term relationship,” he said.

Source: http://www.luxurydaily.com/younger-affluents-with-higher-incomes-more-willing-to-pay-for-fine-wines/

February 25, 2016

SURVEY REVEALS THE 5 LUXURY BRANDS RICH GUYS BUY MOST

D’Marge
By: Elyse Romano
February 25, 2016

When you finally get around to making that billion dollar app idea, what will you do with your new-found wealth?

First you’ll build a Scrooge McDuck money pool and take morning dips. But once that’s taken care of, your closet will need a big-money makeover. A new study by the Luxury Institute reveals the luxury brands that wealthy men love most.

Each brand was rated on quality, exclusivity, social status, and self-enhancement. Of 42 famous menswear purveyors – including Alexander McQueen, Salvatore Ferragamo, Prada, Paul Smith, and Gucci – Calvin Klein topped the list of brands that moneyed men have purchased from in the last year. Calvin also scored highly on name recognition, taking a second top spot on the list of brands men are most familiar with.

Rounding out the top five brands rich guys like to buy are Ralph LaurenHugo BossBurberry, and Giorgio Armani.

Source: http://www.dmarge.com/2016/02/survey-reveals-the-5-luxury-brands-rich-guys-buy-most.html

Affluent men most apt to recommend Isaia, Loro Piana to close connections: report

Luxury Daily
By: Sarah Jones
February 25, 2016

Being popular does not always lead to strong word of mouth, according to a recent survey of affluent men conducted by the Luxury Institute.

The top five brands listed in the men’s consideration sets were not the same as the five they would be most keen to endorse to family and friends. With luxury consumers, particularly those in emerging markets, becoming more sophisticated shoppers, smaller boutique labels have the opportunity to expand awareness by leveraging the recommendations of existing clientele.

“With technology and information at the tip of everyone’s fingertips, customers are becoming much more aware and interested in the boutique and ‘in-the-know’ brands,” said Milton Pedraza, founder and CEO of Luxury Institute. “The customer is better informed not only about the product, but also every aspect of a company’s brand values down to the supply chain.

“The most recognizable brands still have a major advantage, but with the customer’s ability to access product and brand information like never before, these companies are held under a microscope and their clients are willing and able to move to another brand at any moment.”

Luxury Institute’s latest Luxury Brands Status Index polled 3,900 affluent men from the top seven wealthiest nations about 42 menswear brands. Individuals had annual household incomes of at least $150,000 in the United States; 60,000 pounds in the United Kingdom; 50,000 euro in France, Germany and Italy; 1 million yuan in China and 150 million yen in Japan.

Public perception
Consumers were asked how much they agreed with four statements about each brand in question: “This brand delivers consistently superior quality,” “This brand is truly unique and exclusive,” “This brand is purchased by people who are admired and respected” and “This brand makes its buyers feel special across the full customer experience.”

The resulting LBSI ranges from one to 10 and represents an average of all respondents’ scores for the label.

According to the study, Isaia is the most effective at making consumers feel special across the entire purchase experience. The brand is perceived as being a label respected, admired men wear and buy.

While the Italian label is not widely known, with only 3 percent of those surveyed aware of the brand, the relatively small population that is familiar feels very strongly about the brand’s quality. Seventy-five percent of those who know Isaia would recommended it to other consumers.

The top five brands based on status were all small Italian designers with comparably limited awareness. Besides Isaia, men are most willing to endorse Loro Piana, Brunello Cucinelli, Brioni and Ermenegildo Zegna.

Loro Piana Gstaad illustration
Illustration by Loro Piana

On the opposite side of the spectrum is Calvin Klein, which men were most likely to have purchased in the past year. Despite its popularity among affluent male shoppers, Calvin Klein’s LBSI score is lowest among the brands studied.

Next in popularity is Ralph Lauren, which topped the list of brands considered for the next apparel purchase. Rounding out the top five most well-known and frequently purchased labels are Hugo Boss, Burberry and Giorgio Armani.

When it comes to high prices, affluent men feel that Hermès, Brioni, Ermenegildo Zegna and Loro Piana are the most worthy of premium price points. Armani, which came in fifth, was the only brand ranked at the top of the list for price justification and purchase intent.

“Quality, while extremely important, is only one factor that contributes to the success of a brand,” Mr. Pedraza said. “While Loro Piana and Gianluca Isaia scored highest in the Superior Quality LBSI score, they were also among the lowest ranked in Brand Familiarity.

“The consumers’ considerations for next purchase coincide closely with brand familiarity, likely because customers want certainty in their purchases, especially in a downward economy,” he said. “The trusted and familiar brands provide that.”

A similar Luxury Institute survey of affluent women yielded complementary results, showing that both male and female clientele may have more esteem for the labels they are not currently buying from (see story).

Spreading word
Affluent consumers still care about a brand’s rarity, with less common labels having better appeal.

Exclusivity and desirability go hand in hand for China’s wealthy, with the same brands ranked in the top five for both characteristics in a recent study by Promise Consulting and BNP Exane.

Hermès takes home top prize for exclusivity, which measures the consistent quality of goods, the brand’s prestige, the valuation of the brand’s customers and its ability to justify a high price point. Chinese consumers are generally becoming more sophisticated luxury consumers, making for tougher competition between labels for their attention and affection (see story).

For brands with a strong, loyal following, social media makes it easier for word-of-mouth recommendations to spread. Particularly among luxury consumers, a referral can have a large impact on purchase decisions.

According to a recent report by The Future Laboratory, the luxurian demographic relies heavily on the recommendations of friends and family. Many respondents shared that they ask for information and opinions of their peers before purchasing a luxury good or service.

Overall, 23 percent of respondents refer to peers when contemplating a purchase, showing that word of mouth remains powerful in the luxury goods sector (see story).

“Isaia has an incredible opportunity to increase recognition and awareness through relationship building at the front-line level, referral programs and word of mouth generation,” Mr. Pedraza said. “Using social media platforms to appeal to millennials and producing information for customers to review will draw in new consumers.

“Because of their exceptional ranks in quality and customer experience, they have an advantage that will allow brand referrals to spread quickly.”

Source: http://www.luxurydaily.com/affluent-men-most-apt-to-recommend-isaia-loro-piana-to-close-connections-report/

February 24, 2016

What Are The Best Luxury Brands?

Luxury Institute 2016 Global Survey Utilized Those Who Know, Voted – Affluent Men From Seven Countries Rank 42 Luxury Fashion Brands, Rate Each on Multiple Criteria

Pblicty
February 24, 2016

The New York-based Luxury Institute surveyed 3,900 high-income consumers from seven countries who met the following income thresholds in local currencies: United States ($150,000); United Kingdom (£60,000); France, Germany, Italy (EUR50,000); China (1 million CNY); and Japan (¥150 million).

Interestingly, “smaller brands now more than ever are finding it easier to make a big impact on the fashion industry in a relatively short period of time as they use the latest technology to bring their designs to a global stage,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “In this kind of landscape, both bigger and smaller fashion houses need to monitor the degree to which their brands resonate favorably with their target customers.”

Respondents rated 42 men’s fashion brands (0-10) on quality, exclusivity, social status, and self-enhancement. In addition, affluent shoppers weighed in on whether they are willing to recommend specific brands to family and friends. They also indicated which fashion brands are worth the premium prices, and which brands they are most likely to consider for upcoming fashion purchases.

Luxury Brand Status Index scores range from 0-10, and are an average of respondents’ degree of agreement with each of the following four statements:

- “This brand delivers consistently superior quality.”

- “This brand is truly unique and exclusive.”

- “This brand is purchased by people who are admired and respected.”

- “This brand makes its buyers feel special across the full customer experience.”

Worldwide popularity does not equate to higher brand status. In fact, each of the top five men’s fashion brands are smaller Italian designers with which only a very few affluent men were familiar.

Gianluca Isaia is a worldwide standout for being purchased by people who are admired and respected, and was also named the best brand at making buyers feel special across the full customer experience. In addition, 75% of men who are familiar with the Isaia brand would recommend it to others. Despite being held in high esteem by affluent travelers, Isaia is not a well-known name, identified by only 3% of men surveyed.

Calvin Klein is the brand that men around the world are most likely to have purchased in the past year, even though Calvin Klein ranks last in overall LBSI score among all brands evaluated. Ralph Lauren is the brand most likely to be considered the next time a fashion purchase is made, and it is among the three most popular brands along with Calvin Klein and Brooks Brothers among affluent U.S. men.

Worldwide, the top five fashion brands with which affluent men are most familiar, and most likely to have purchased in the past year, are Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren, Hugo Boss, Burberry, and Giorgio Armani. Armani is also one of the top five brands that affluent men from around the world view as most worthy of premium pricing. The top four are Hermès, Brioni, Ermenegildo Zegna, and Loro Piana.

The willingness of affluent shoppers to recommend a brand to family and close friends may be the best overall measure of satisfaction. On a global basis, wealthy men are most likely to recommend Gianluca Isaia, Loro Piana, Brunello Cucinelli, Brioni, and Ermenegildo Zegna.

Below are all 42 men’s luxury fashion brands under consideration in the 2016 LBSI survey:

1. Alexander McQueen

2. Balenciaga

3. Bally

4. Bottega Veneta

5. Brioni

6. Brooks Brothers

7. Brunello Cucinelli

8. Burberry

9. Calvin Klein

10. Canali

11. Dior Homme

12. Dolce & Gabbana

13. Dunhill

14. Ermenegildo Zegna

15. Etro

16. Faconnable

17. Salvatore Ferragamo

18. Giorgio Armani

19. Gianluca Isaia

20. Givenchy

21. Gucci

22. Hermes

23. Hugo Boss

24. Jil Sander

25. John Varvatos

Source: https://www.pblcty.com/article/12645/what-are-the-best-luxury-brands

February 23, 2016

These Are the 5 Brands Rich Guys Buy Most

GQ Magazine
By: Justin Fenner
February 23, 2016

Know what gets between guys (with money) and their Calvins? Nothing.

A new study by the Luxury Institute has found that men with lots of discretionary income really, really like Calvin Klein and the wares created by its menswear designer Italo Zuchelli. Of 42 high-end purveyors of men’s clothes—including Brunello Cucinelli, Alexander McQueen, and Valentino—Calvin Klein is at the top of the list for brands that rich dudes have purchased something from in the past year.

Part of what makes Calvin so successful is its name recognition: the study also found that men of means are more familiar with Calvin Klein than any other brand, which means putting Kendall Jenner and Justin Bieber in all those ads is working.

The rest of the top five brands that rich guys like to buy includes Ralph Lauren, Hugo Boss, Burberry, and Giorgio Armani. Ralph Lauren is the brand that these men are most likely to think about first the next time they go shopping, and Armani is among the companies whose clothes are viewed as actually being worth their high prices.

To find out all of this, the Luxury Institute surveyed over 3,900 men from the United States, the United Kingdom, China, France, Germany, Italy, and Japan who had to meet different income requirements: men in America and China, for example, had to pull in a salary around $150,000 a year to take the questionnaire, but Brits only needed to bring in $85,000.

The results of the survey are a clear indication that regardless of what they make, wealthy guys aren’t afraid to spend money on luxe clothing—so long as it comes from a brand with an established track record of making high-quality stuff. And here we thought half the fun of fashion was taking risks.

Source: http://www.gq.com/story/5-brands-rich-men-buy-study

February 11, 2016

Chanel, Hermès rank as top brands worth premium pricing: survey

Luxury Daily
By: Jen King
February 11, 2016

The popularity of a widely bought brand does not always sync with consumers’ perception of its value and luxury credentials, according to a new survey by the Luxury Institute.

For its Luxury Brand Status Index series, Luxury Institute surveyed affluent women from seven of the world’s wealthiest nations to gain insights on which brands hold the most clout in terms of quality, exclusivity, social status and overall ownership. Consumer opinion is tied to whether she feels the asking price of a premium product is worth it and correlates directly to the brand’s perceived value by those who shop it frequently and those who aspire to do so.

“Luxury and premium brands  provide their customers quality and expertly crafted products and deliver them with empathy, trustworthiness and generosity to build client relationships,” said Milton Pedraza, founder and CEO of Luxury Institute.

“The result is a compelling product paired with an experience that cannot be found within the mass market,” he said. “These brands have a compelling value proposition that appeals to affluent women.”

Luxury Institute’s “2016 Global Luxury Brand Status Index (LBSI) – Women’s Fashion” surveyed 3,999 affluent women from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, China and Japan. The women surveyed gave more than four dozen brands a score of 0-10 based on the following prompts: This brand delivers consistently superior quality; This brand is truly unique and exclusive; This brand is purchased by people who are admired and respected and This brand makes its buyers feel special across the full customer experience.

Flexing credentials
The value of a luxury product is not solely based on market retail price, but rather a combination of quality, exclusivity and pride of ownership. If a brand is popular it is not a true representation of its luxury credentials.

For example, U.S. fashion label Calvin Klein is immensely popular among affluent women, with most consumers likely to have purchased from the brand in the past year. However, Calvin Klein’s popularity does not translate to a high LBSI score, with the brand placing at the bottom of Luxury Institute’s overall ratings.

Similarly, the most popular fashion brands among women in the U.S. are Calvin Klein, Polo Ralph Lauren and Michael Kors. While popular and on the lower end of the price spectrum in relation to higher-end brands, these labels are not always associated with the exclusivity of true luxury.

michael kors.resort16
Michael Kors, resort 2016

Familiarity and popularity status does not always translate to increased sales, either.

While France’s Chanel was the most familiar fashion house among respondents, the atelier only placed second when respondents were asked which brand they plan to purchase from next. Based on next purchase plans, Chanel placed behind Calvin Klein and ahead of Polo Ralph Lauren and Burberry.

If a consumer agrees that a brand is worth premium prices, it is often an indication of the brand’s overall value. As such, affluent women ranked Chanel and French leather goods maker Hermès as the two fashion houses most worth their premium asking prices, followed by Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton and Prada.

Hermes shoe fw 2014
Hermès fall/winter 2014

To highlight value and justify high price tags, luxury brands often communicate their message of worth through the use of craftsmanship. Chanel most recently took this approach to express the value of its most exclusive collection, its couture offerings.

To do so, Chanel took consumers inside its house to cultivate exclusivity and mystery.

The latest chapter of the ongoing Inside Chanel series focuses on the creation of the brand’s haute couture clothing. While the reveal will satisfy the modern consumer’s craving for transparency, the breakneck speed of the video and repeated use of Coco Chanel quotes maintains the brand’s more enigmatic aspects (see story).

Still from Inside Chanel Chapter 13
Still from Inside Chanel N°13 

Luxury brands are also adept in customer experience and making the consumer feel special. The LBSI results showed that a mix of well-established and newer brands are well-versed in this area, with Hermès, Temperley London, Chanel, Brunello Cucinelli and Proenza Schouler as the top five.

Despite an increase in digital communications, the luxury space still relies heavily on word of mouth recommendations. Word of mouth remains as the best measure of satisfaction if a consumer has enjoyed her experience with a brand’s products and services.

Globally, affluent women who partook in the survey are most likely to recommend Loro Piana, Chanel, Hermès, Akris and Brunello Cucinelli to family and close friends.

Smaller, boutique labels proved themselves within the survey responses as well, showing that a brand does not need a rich heritage to resonate with affluent consumers when considering value and standing.

“It was interesting to see that boutique luxury brands such as Temperley London, Brunello Cucinelli and Proenza Schouler scored nearly as high as well established luxury brands such as Hermès and Chanel,” Mr. Pedraza said.

“Specifically, Proenza Schouler received an overall 7.66 LBSI, higher than luxury veterans such as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Prada,” he said. “The luxury customer base is open to less recognized brands that are able to provide an exclusive and unique product paired with an exceptional customer experience.

“Brands can no longer rely heavily on their rich heritage and recognition to keep clients loyal as competition increases and customers recognize the value of boutique brands.”

Measures of desire
Having an understanding of which brands are most desirable within a particular market can help labels structure strategies in that location.

Exclusivity and desirability go hand in hand for China’s wealthy, with the same brands ranked in the top five for both characteristics in a new study by Promise Consulting and BNP Exane.

Hermès takes home top prize for exclusivity, which measures the consistent quality of goods, the brand’s prestige, the valuation of the brand’s customers and its ability to justify a high price point. Chinese consumers are generally becoming more sophisticated luxury consumers, making for tougher competition between labels for their attention and affection (see story).

Likewise, an in depth understanding of consumer behavior in different markets is also useful as brands navigate the likes and interests of various demographics.

As the luxury landscape continues to evolve and geopolitical turmoil affects emerging markets, the brands that will come out on top must be able to adapt to the resulting consumer behavior.

On Sept. 29 in New York, part of a 15-city world tour of sorts, Albatross Global Solutions shared insights from its annual research study “The Journey of the Luxury Consumer” to better understand motivators, the purchase journey and the consumer landscape on a global scale. A key finding has been the definition of luxury itself as consumer interest has developed from a desire for exclusivity to wanting ensured craftsmanship from the high-end brands they interact with (see story).

Raising a brand’s standing among the opinions of affluent consumers presents its challenges.

“Brands can only improve their LBSI by improving these factors in a genuine way that resonates with the customer,” Mr. Pedraza said.

“Luxury CEOs tell us that approximately 60 percent of the value derived by the luxury client is in the luxury product, and 40 percent of the value is in the relationship building capabilities,” he said.  “Brands need to continue to remain relevant, especially in this challenging environment.”

Source: http://www.luxurydaily.com/chanel-hermes-rank-as-top-brands-worth-premium-pricing-survey/

December 18, 2015

Luxury travellers have dim view of Trump brand: survey

Marketing experts weigh in on how to do a hotel rebranding properly
Business Vancover
By: Glen Korstrom
December 17, 2015

The Trump brand is weak among luxury travellers, according to a new survey – a finding likely to fuel more controversy over whether Vancouver’s Holborn Group made a wise decision by contracting with Trump International to put the Trump brand on its under-construction hotel.

Trump ranked 40th out of 40 luxury hotel brands when wealthy travellers who were familiar with the brand were asked whether they would recommend the brand to family or friends, according to the 2016 Global Hotels Luxury Brand Status Index, which the Luxury Institute released December 17.

Strict privacy laws in Canada meant none of the survey respondents were Canadian, CEO Milton Pedraza told Business in Vancouver in an interview.

Instead, the New York-based Luxury Institute found its 3,900 respondents by buying lists from reputable companies that were able to determine income for those who live in the U.S., U.K., Japan, China, France, Germany and Italy.

Luxury brand Maybourne Hotels ranked No. 1 in each of four metrics, for which respondents were asked to grade hotels on a scale of 0 to 10:

•delivering consistent superior quality;

•being unique and exclusive;

•being visited by people who are admired and respected; and

•making guests feel special.

Trump ranked No. 34 for quality, No. 30 for exclusivity, No. 31 for having admired and respected guests, and No. 37 for making guests feel special.

“The survey was in the late summer,” Pedraza said. “This was before [company owner and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump] started making all of the super-vile statements.”

In fairness, the sample size for those who graded Trump hotels was lower than those who graded much larger brands, such as Ritz-Carlton, Four Seasons and JW Marriott, because participants were only allowed to grade brands that they were familiar with or had experienced.

This was the first year that the Luxury Institute included the Trump brand because, in previous years, the nine-hotel brand was considered too small. Trump representatives then lobbied the Luxury Institute to be included, Pedraza said.

Trump is expected to open hotels in Baku, Azerbaijan in early 2016 and then one in Rio de Janeiro before Vancouver opens in July to make the chain a complete dozen.

Trump International Hotel & Tower Vancouver general manager Philipp Posch told BIV that he would not comment on the survey because he was not familiar with it.

Marketing for his hotel has not yet started.

“We’ll wait out the holidays and probably by January or so, we’ll reach out to clients and start the marketing process and machine,” Posch said December 17.

Click here to read a profile of Phillip Posch

How to do a rebranding properly

Branding experts say Holborn likely wishes that it never hitched its horse to the Trump cavalcade and that the situation underscores the need to have an escape clause in contracts.

“People who do these masthead deals for hotels might want to look at sports sponsorships,” said Brandever principal and branding expert Bernie Hadley Beauregard.

Those deals often end the day after a sponsored, star athlete does something objectionable.

A recent spate of hotel rebrandings in B.C. has experts pointing out both how to do a rebranding properly and what to avoid.

(Victoria’s Hotel Zed has won awards for its rebranding of what was previously known as the Blueridge Inn | Crazyintherain.com)

Branding experts’ biggest lessons are to keep the name short and catchy while making sure that the brand is consistent across the chain so guests will know what to expect.

Keeping a brand consistent across properties is a lesson regardless of the sector.

“The art form of branding is to bring the name down to be something that is usable and memorable to the consumer,” Hadley Beauregard said.

He pointed to Portland, Oregon-based Ace Hotels, which has seven hotels around the world in cities as varied as London, Panama City and Seattle.

“Always artistic, eclectic and hip, Ace Hotels often redefine their host city’s magnetic centre,” he said. “Their brand aura is such that you want to make a pilgrimage to see their properties, even if you aren’t staying there.”

Victoria-based Accent Inns’ rebranding of its secondary, economy hotel to Hotel Zed from Blueridge Inn, in 2014, similarly aimed for a hipper image and a short succinct name.

Rooms at Hotel Zed in Victoria have modern elements such as flat-screen TVs, which have media hubs to project iPhone screens onto the TV monitor.

Basically, however, the hotel’s shtick is that it is made to look retro – complete with rotary-dial telephones and furniture and lamps that appear to be out of the 1970s. A multicoloured 1967 Volkswagen van is parked outside and typewriters in the lobby are for guests to use.

“Because Accent Inns starts with an ‘A,’ we can also say that we’ve got brands that go from A to Zed,” Accent Inns marketing director John Espley told BIV.

The rebranding was such a success that Accent Inns plans to open a second Hotel Zed, in Kelowna, next summer. Accent Inns won recognition for the rebranding at the Victoria Real Estate Board Commercial Building Awards in the hotel category. Destination British Columbia then highlighted the hotel when it unveiled its new $2.6M marketing strategy late last year.

Beauregard, however, is less enthusiastic about Vancouver-based Pinnacle International’s rebranding of its longtime Renaissance Vancouver Harbourside Hotel as the Pinnacle Hotel Vancouver Harbourfront.

“Too many words,” Hadley Beauregard said. “My head hurts.”

Making the rebranding more puzzling, he said, is that the new Pinnacle Hotel Vancouver Harbourfront is virtually across the street from a second hotel that also has “Pinnacle” in an even wordier name: the Vancouver Mariott Pinnacle Downtown Hotel.

(Kyle Matheson is director of hospitality marketing at Pinnacle Hotel Vancouver Harbourfront | Rob Kruyt)

What’s worse than simply having two hotels extremely close together, with both carrying the distinctive word “Pinnacle” somewhere in the brand, is the fact that the two hotels are managed by two different companies – Marriott International and Pinnacle International – even though they are both owned by Pinnacle International.

The two hotels therefore have different offerings for guests.

The Marriott Pinnacle, for example, requires guests to join a loyalty program to get free Wi-Fi whereas the Pinnacle Harbourfront provides guests free Wi-Fi with no need to join any program.

“This creates confusion in consumers’ minds,” Hadley Beauregard said.

“Brand consistency is key.”

Rationale for recent Pinnacle’s rebranding

Pinnacle International has contracted Marriott to manage the Marriott Pinnacle for the past decade.

Paying a management company a fee up to about 5% of revenue to be able to use a global brand such as Marriott is called “flagging” a property.

The common practice is exactly what happened when Holborn Group agreed to pay Trump International to be able to use the Trump brand on Holborn’s hotel.

The point of this strategy is to coast on the brand recognition of a well-known manager such as Marriott or Trump.

Pinnacle International, which is best known as a real estate developer, ended its management contract with Marriott’s Renaissance Hotels earlier this year. That meant that it had to come up with a new name for the property.

Its director of hospitality marketing, Kyle Matheson, told BIV that the new Pinnacle Harbourfront name makes it clear that the hotel is near Vancouver’s harbour.

Using Pinnacle in the name was done because Pinnacle International both owns and manages two other B.C. hotels: Pinnacle at the Pier in North Vancouver and Pinnacle Hotel Whistler.

“The goal with rebranding the [former Renaissance] property as Pinnacle Harbourfront was to broaden our hospitality and hotels and restaurants portfolio under our own Pinnacle name,” he said.

 Source: https://www.biv.com/article/2015/12/luxury-travellers-have-dim-view-trump-brand-survey/

 

October 14, 2014

WEALTHY AMERICANS RANK PREMIUM WINES, DIVULGE SPENDING AND DRINKING HABITS IN NEW LUXURY INSTITUTE SURVEY

Market Wired

NEW YORK, NY — (Marketwired) — 10/14/14 — More than two-thirds (70%) of wealthy U.S. consumers, under the age of 50, drink wine at least once a month, and they’re willing to pay premium prices for preferred vintages — an average of $48 per bottle at retail and $64 at a restaurant. These are among findings of the New York-based Luxury Institute’s just released Luxury Brand Status Index (LBSI) premium wines survey.

Consumers 21 and older from households with income of at least $150,000 a year evaluated 20 premium domestic wine brands on the degree to which each embodies the four “pillars” of brand value: superior quality, exclusivity, enhanced social status and an overall superior consumption experience. Respondents also reveal which wines are worth paying premium prices, which they would recommend to people close to them, and which brand they will buy next.

Based on overall 1-10 LBSI scores, Ghost Pines (7.65) earns top honors, and it ranks the highest on all four pillars of value. Known for California winemaker Michael Eddy’s multi-appellation blends of grapes from Napa, Sonoma, Monterey and San Joaquin counties, Ghost Pines is also the brand consumers deem most worthy of a price premium, even though many of its bottles sell for less than $20.

Other highly ranked premium domestic brands include Mount Veeder (7.39), Meiomi (7.30), Bridlewood (7.16) and Edna Valley (6.90).

“Winemaking is the quintessential luxury business in many ways,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Brand value begins with the best-quality raw materials and grows with fine craftsmanship and a relentless focus on execution and consistently delighting customers.”

Contact the Luxury Institute for more details and complete survey data.

Visit us at www.LuxuryInstitute.com and contact us with any questions or for more information.

The Luxury Institute, LLC
luxinfo@luxuryinstitute.com

Source:

http://www.einnews.com/pr_news/229093149/wealthy-americans-rank-premium-wines-divulge-spending-and-drinking-habits-in-new-luxury-institute-survey

September 23, 2014

Luxury Institute Survey Of High-Income Travelers from Europe, China and Japan Reveals Brand Status Ranking Of World’s Top Luxury Hotels

NEW YORK) September 23, 2014 – The New York-based Luxury Institute has released findings of its 2014 Luxury Hotels Brand Status Index (LBSI) survey of affluent overseas travelers who shared detailed impressions and evaluations of 37 global luxury hotel brands.

LBSI scores (1-10) are based on each brand’s perceived quality, exclusivity, social status and overall guest experience. In addition, affluent consumers weigh in on whether a hotel deserves premium pricing, if they would recommend it to people close to them and how likely they are to stay at a brand’s property on their next trip.

Here are the top five brands as rated by wealthy consumers from each region, with Europe including the U.K., Germany, France and Italy.

Europe:Small Luxury Hotels of the World (7.96), The Ritz-Carlton (7.95),Armani Hotels (7.88), Mandarin Oriental (7.86), Leading Hotels of the World (7.77)

China: Leading Hotels of the World (8.62), Oberoi (8.57), The Luxury Collection (8.54), Firmdale Hotels (8.53), Raffles Hotels and Resorts (8.50)

Japan:Aman Resorts (8.19), Oberoi (7.83), Waldorf Astoria Hotels and Resorts (7.80), The Ritz-Carlton (7.73), Orient-Express Hotels (7.68)

“The luxury hotel industry is growing in potential, but also in the dramatic number of brands that have top tier offerings,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “The winners are those who can consistently provide remarkable guest experiences, as rated by the clients.”

Respondents reviewed the following hotel brands: Aman Resorts, Armani Hotels, Banyan Tree, Club Med, Como Hotels and Resorts, Conrad Hotels and Resorts, Fairmont Hotels and Resorts, Firmdale Hotels, Four Seasons, Grand Hyatt, InterContinental, Jumeirah, JW Marriott, Kempinski Hotels, Le Meridien, Langham, Leading Hotels of the World, Loews Hotels, The Luxury Collection, Mandarin Oriental, Oberoi, Orient-Express Hotels, Pan Pacific, Park Hyatt, The Peninsula Hotels, Raffles Hotels and Resorts, Regent, The Ritz-Carlton, The Rocco Forte Collection, Rosewood, Shangri-La Hotels & Resorts, Small Luxury Hotels of the World, Sofitel, St. Regis, Taj Hotels Resorts and Palaces, W Hotels and Resorts, and Waldorf Astoria Hotels and Resorts.

Contact the Luxury Institute for more details and complete rankings.

Visit us at www.LuxuryInstitute.com and contact us with any questions or for more information.

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