Luxury Institute News

February 11, 2016

Chanel, Hermès rank as top brands worth premium pricing: survey

Luxury Daily
By: Jen King
February 11, 2016

The popularity of a widely bought brand does not always sync with consumers’ perception of its value and luxury credentials, according to a new survey by the Luxury Institute.

For its Luxury Brand Status Index series, Luxury Institute surveyed affluent women from seven of the world’s wealthiest nations to gain insights on which brands hold the most clout in terms of quality, exclusivity, social status and overall ownership. Consumer opinion is tied to whether she feels the asking price of a premium product is worth it and correlates directly to the brand’s perceived value by those who shop it frequently and those who aspire to do so.

“Luxury and premium brands  provide their customers quality and expertly crafted products and deliver them with empathy, trustworthiness and generosity to build client relationships,” said Milton Pedraza, founder and CEO of Luxury Institute.

“The result is a compelling product paired with an experience that cannot be found within the mass market,” he said. “These brands have a compelling value proposition that appeals to affluent women.”

Luxury Institute’s “2016 Global Luxury Brand Status Index (LBSI) – Women’s Fashion” surveyed 3,999 affluent women from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, China and Japan. The women surveyed gave more than four dozen brands a score of 0-10 based on the following prompts: This brand delivers consistently superior quality; This brand is truly unique and exclusive; This brand is purchased by people who are admired and respected and This brand makes its buyers feel special across the full customer experience.

Flexing credentials
The value of a luxury product is not solely based on market retail price, but rather a combination of quality, exclusivity and pride of ownership. If a brand is popular it is not a true representation of its luxury credentials.

For example, U.S. fashion label Calvin Klein is immensely popular among affluent women, with most consumers likely to have purchased from the brand in the past year. However, Calvin Klein’s popularity does not translate to a high LBSI score, with the brand placing at the bottom of Luxury Institute’s overall ratings.

Similarly, the most popular fashion brands among women in the U.S. are Calvin Klein, Polo Ralph Lauren and Michael Kors. While popular and on the lower end of the price spectrum in relation to higher-end brands, these labels are not always associated with the exclusivity of true luxury.

michael kors.resort16
Michael Kors, resort 2016

Familiarity and popularity status does not always translate to increased sales, either.

While France’s Chanel was the most familiar fashion house among respondents, the atelier only placed second when respondents were asked which brand they plan to purchase from next. Based on next purchase plans, Chanel placed behind Calvin Klein and ahead of Polo Ralph Lauren and Burberry.

If a consumer agrees that a brand is worth premium prices, it is often an indication of the brand’s overall value. As such, affluent women ranked Chanel and French leather goods maker Hermès as the two fashion houses most worth their premium asking prices, followed by Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton and Prada.

Hermes shoe fw 2014
Hermès fall/winter 2014

To highlight value and justify high price tags, luxury brands often communicate their message of worth through the use of craftsmanship. Chanel most recently took this approach to express the value of its most exclusive collection, its couture offerings.

To do so, Chanel took consumers inside its house to cultivate exclusivity and mystery.

The latest chapter of the ongoing Inside Chanel series focuses on the creation of the brand’s haute couture clothing. While the reveal will satisfy the modern consumer’s craving for transparency, the breakneck speed of the video and repeated use of Coco Chanel quotes maintains the brand’s more enigmatic aspects (see story).

Still from Inside Chanel Chapter 13
Still from Inside Chanel N°13 

Luxury brands are also adept in customer experience and making the consumer feel special. The LBSI results showed that a mix of well-established and newer brands are well-versed in this area, with Hermès, Temperley London, Chanel, Brunello Cucinelli and Proenza Schouler as the top five.

Despite an increase in digital communications, the luxury space still relies heavily on word of mouth recommendations. Word of mouth remains as the best measure of satisfaction if a consumer has enjoyed her experience with a brand’s products and services.

Globally, affluent women who partook in the survey are most likely to recommend Loro Piana, Chanel, Hermès, Akris and Brunello Cucinelli to family and close friends.

Smaller, boutique labels proved themselves within the survey responses as well, showing that a brand does not need a rich heritage to resonate with affluent consumers when considering value and standing.

“It was interesting to see that boutique luxury brands such as Temperley London, Brunello Cucinelli and Proenza Schouler scored nearly as high as well established luxury brands such as Hermès and Chanel,” Mr. Pedraza said.

“Specifically, Proenza Schouler received an overall 7.66 LBSI, higher than luxury veterans such as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Prada,” he said. “The luxury customer base is open to less recognized brands that are able to provide an exclusive and unique product paired with an exceptional customer experience.

“Brands can no longer rely heavily on their rich heritage and recognition to keep clients loyal as competition increases and customers recognize the value of boutique brands.”

Measures of desire
Having an understanding of which brands are most desirable within a particular market can help labels structure strategies in that location.

Exclusivity and desirability go hand in hand for China’s wealthy, with the same brands ranked in the top five for both characteristics in a new study by Promise Consulting and BNP Exane.

Hermès takes home top prize for exclusivity, which measures the consistent quality of goods, the brand’s prestige, the valuation of the brand’s customers and its ability to justify a high price point. Chinese consumers are generally becoming more sophisticated luxury consumers, making for tougher competition between labels for their attention and affection (see story).

Likewise, an in depth understanding of consumer behavior in different markets is also useful as brands navigate the likes and interests of various demographics.

As the luxury landscape continues to evolve and geopolitical turmoil affects emerging markets, the brands that will come out on top must be able to adapt to the resulting consumer behavior.

On Sept. 29 in New York, part of a 15-city world tour of sorts, Albatross Global Solutions shared insights from its annual research study “The Journey of the Luxury Consumer” to better understand motivators, the purchase journey and the consumer landscape on a global scale. A key finding has been the definition of luxury itself as consumer interest has developed from a desire for exclusivity to wanting ensured craftsmanship from the high-end brands they interact with (see story).

Raising a brand’s standing among the opinions of affluent consumers presents its challenges.

“Brands can only improve their LBSI by improving these factors in a genuine way that resonates with the customer,” Mr. Pedraza said.

“Luxury CEOs tell us that approximately 60 percent of the value derived by the luxury client is in the luxury product, and 40 percent of the value is in the relationship building capabilities,” he said.  “Brands need to continue to remain relevant, especially in this challenging environment.”

Source: http://www.luxurydaily.com/chanel-hermes-rank-as-top-brands-worth-premium-pricing-survey/

December 18, 2015

Luxury travellers have dim view of Trump brand: survey

Marketing experts weigh in on how to do a hotel rebranding properly
Business Vancover
By: Glen Korstrom
December 17, 2015

The Trump brand is weak among luxury travellers, according to a new survey – a finding likely to fuel more controversy over whether Vancouver’s Holborn Group made a wise decision by contracting with Trump International to put the Trump brand on its under-construction hotel.

Trump ranked 40th out of 40 luxury hotel brands when wealthy travellers who were familiar with the brand were asked whether they would recommend the brand to family or friends, according to the 2016 Global Hotels Luxury Brand Status Index, which the Luxury Institute released December 17.

Strict privacy laws in Canada meant none of the survey respondents were Canadian, CEO Milton Pedraza told Business in Vancouver in an interview.

Instead, the New York-based Luxury Institute found its 3,900 respondents by buying lists from reputable companies that were able to determine income for those who live in the U.S., U.K., Japan, China, France, Germany and Italy.

Luxury brand Maybourne Hotels ranked No. 1 in each of four metrics, for which respondents were asked to grade hotels on a scale of 0 to 10:

•delivering consistent superior quality;

•being unique and exclusive;

•being visited by people who are admired and respected; and

•making guests feel special.

Trump ranked No. 34 for quality, No. 30 for exclusivity, No. 31 for having admired and respected guests, and No. 37 for making guests feel special.

“The survey was in the late summer,” Pedraza said. “This was before [company owner and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump] started making all of the super-vile statements.”

In fairness, the sample size for those who graded Trump hotels was lower than those who graded much larger brands, such as Ritz-Carlton, Four Seasons and JW Marriott, because participants were only allowed to grade brands that they were familiar with or had experienced.

This was the first year that the Luxury Institute included the Trump brand because, in previous years, the nine-hotel brand was considered too small. Trump representatives then lobbied the Luxury Institute to be included, Pedraza said.

Trump is expected to open hotels in Baku, Azerbaijan in early 2016 and then one in Rio de Janeiro before Vancouver opens in July to make the chain a complete dozen.

Trump International Hotel & Tower Vancouver general manager Philipp Posch told BIV that he would not comment on the survey because he was not familiar with it.

Marketing for his hotel has not yet started.

“We’ll wait out the holidays and probably by January or so, we’ll reach out to clients and start the marketing process and machine,” Posch said December 17.

Click here to read a profile of Phillip Posch

How to do a rebranding properly

Branding experts say Holborn likely wishes that it never hitched its horse to the Trump cavalcade and that the situation underscores the need to have an escape clause in contracts.

“People who do these masthead deals for hotels might want to look at sports sponsorships,” said Brandever principal and branding expert Bernie Hadley Beauregard.

Those deals often end the day after a sponsored, star athlete does something objectionable.

A recent spate of hotel rebrandings in B.C. has experts pointing out both how to do a rebranding properly and what to avoid.

(Victoria’s Hotel Zed has won awards for its rebranding of what was previously known as the Blueridge Inn | Crazyintherain.com)

Branding experts’ biggest lessons are to keep the name short and catchy while making sure that the brand is consistent across the chain so guests will know what to expect.

Keeping a brand consistent across properties is a lesson regardless of the sector.

“The art form of branding is to bring the name down to be something that is usable and memorable to the consumer,” Hadley Beauregard said.

He pointed to Portland, Oregon-based Ace Hotels, which has seven hotels around the world in cities as varied as London, Panama City and Seattle.

“Always artistic, eclectic and hip, Ace Hotels often redefine their host city’s magnetic centre,” he said. “Their brand aura is such that you want to make a pilgrimage to see their properties, even if you aren’t staying there.”

Victoria-based Accent Inns’ rebranding of its secondary, economy hotel to Hotel Zed from Blueridge Inn, in 2014, similarly aimed for a hipper image and a short succinct name.

Rooms at Hotel Zed in Victoria have modern elements such as flat-screen TVs, which have media hubs to project iPhone screens onto the TV monitor.

Basically, however, the hotel’s shtick is that it is made to look retro – complete with rotary-dial telephones and furniture and lamps that appear to be out of the 1970s. A multicoloured 1967 Volkswagen van is parked outside and typewriters in the lobby are for guests to use.

“Because Accent Inns starts with an ‘A,’ we can also say that we’ve got brands that go from A to Zed,” Accent Inns marketing director John Espley told BIV.

The rebranding was such a success that Accent Inns plans to open a second Hotel Zed, in Kelowna, next summer. Accent Inns won recognition for the rebranding at the Victoria Real Estate Board Commercial Building Awards in the hotel category. Destination British Columbia then highlighted the hotel when it unveiled its new $2.6M marketing strategy late last year.

Beauregard, however, is less enthusiastic about Vancouver-based Pinnacle International’s rebranding of its longtime Renaissance Vancouver Harbourside Hotel as the Pinnacle Hotel Vancouver Harbourfront.

“Too many words,” Hadley Beauregard said. “My head hurts.”

Making the rebranding more puzzling, he said, is that the new Pinnacle Hotel Vancouver Harbourfront is virtually across the street from a second hotel that also has “Pinnacle” in an even wordier name: the Vancouver Mariott Pinnacle Downtown Hotel.

(Kyle Matheson is director of hospitality marketing at Pinnacle Hotel Vancouver Harbourfront | Rob Kruyt)

What’s worse than simply having two hotels extremely close together, with both carrying the distinctive word “Pinnacle” somewhere in the brand, is the fact that the two hotels are managed by two different companies – Marriott International and Pinnacle International – even though they are both owned by Pinnacle International.

The two hotels therefore have different offerings for guests.

The Marriott Pinnacle, for example, requires guests to join a loyalty program to get free Wi-Fi whereas the Pinnacle Harbourfront provides guests free Wi-Fi with no need to join any program.

“This creates confusion in consumers’ minds,” Hadley Beauregard said.

“Brand consistency is key.”

Rationale for recent Pinnacle’s rebranding

Pinnacle International has contracted Marriott to manage the Marriott Pinnacle for the past decade.

Paying a management company a fee up to about 5% of revenue to be able to use a global brand such as Marriott is called “flagging” a property.

The common practice is exactly what happened when Holborn Group agreed to pay Trump International to be able to use the Trump brand on Holborn’s hotel.

The point of this strategy is to coast on the brand recognition of a well-known manager such as Marriott or Trump.

Pinnacle International, which is best known as a real estate developer, ended its management contract with Marriott’s Renaissance Hotels earlier this year. That meant that it had to come up with a new name for the property.

Its director of hospitality marketing, Kyle Matheson, told BIV that the new Pinnacle Harbourfront name makes it clear that the hotel is near Vancouver’s harbour.

Using Pinnacle in the name was done because Pinnacle International both owns and manages two other B.C. hotels: Pinnacle at the Pier in North Vancouver and Pinnacle Hotel Whistler.

“The goal with rebranding the [former Renaissance] property as Pinnacle Harbourfront was to broaden our hospitality and hotels and restaurants portfolio under our own Pinnacle name,” he said.

 Source: https://www.biv.com/article/2015/12/luxury-travellers-have-dim-view-trump-brand-survey/

 

October 14, 2014

WEALTHY AMERICANS RANK PREMIUM WINES, DIVULGE SPENDING AND DRINKING HABITS IN NEW LUXURY INSTITUTE SURVEY

Market Wired

NEW YORK, NY — (Marketwired) — 10/14/14 — More than two-thirds (70%) of wealthy U.S. consumers, under the age of 50, drink wine at least once a month, and they’re willing to pay premium prices for preferred vintages — an average of $48 per bottle at retail and $64 at a restaurant. These are among findings of the New York-based Luxury Institute’s just released Luxury Brand Status Index (LBSI) premium wines survey.

Consumers 21 and older from households with income of at least $150,000 a year evaluated 20 premium domestic wine brands on the degree to which each embodies the four “pillars” of brand value: superior quality, exclusivity, enhanced social status and an overall superior consumption experience. Respondents also reveal which wines are worth paying premium prices, which they would recommend to people close to them, and which brand they will buy next.

Based on overall 1-10 LBSI scores, Ghost Pines (7.65) earns top honors, and it ranks the highest on all four pillars of value. Known for California winemaker Michael Eddy’s multi-appellation blends of grapes from Napa, Sonoma, Monterey and San Joaquin counties, Ghost Pines is also the brand consumers deem most worthy of a price premium, even though many of its bottles sell for less than $20.

Other highly ranked premium domestic brands include Mount Veeder (7.39), Meiomi (7.30), Bridlewood (7.16) and Edna Valley (6.90).

“Winemaking is the quintessential luxury business in many ways,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Brand value begins with the best-quality raw materials and grows with fine craftsmanship and a relentless focus on execution and consistently delighting customers.”

Contact the Luxury Institute for more details and complete survey data.

Visit us at www.LuxuryInstitute.com and contact us with any questions or for more information.

The Luxury Institute, LLC
luxinfo@luxuryinstitute.com

Source:

http://www.einnews.com/pr_news/229093149/wealthy-americans-rank-premium-wines-divulge-spending-and-drinking-habits-in-new-luxury-institute-survey

September 23, 2014

Luxury Institute Survey Of High-Income Travelers from Europe, China and Japan Reveals Brand Status Ranking Of World’s Top Luxury Hotels

NEW YORK) September 23, 2014 – The New York-based Luxury Institute has released findings of its 2014 Luxury Hotels Brand Status Index (LBSI) survey of affluent overseas travelers who shared detailed impressions and evaluations of 37 global luxury hotel brands.

LBSI scores (1-10) are based on each brand’s perceived quality, exclusivity, social status and overall guest experience. In addition, affluent consumers weigh in on whether a hotel deserves premium pricing, if they would recommend it to people close to them and how likely they are to stay at a brand’s property on their next trip.

Here are the top five brands as rated by wealthy consumers from each region, with Europe including the U.K., Germany, France and Italy.

Europe:Small Luxury Hotels of the World (7.96), The Ritz-Carlton (7.95),Armani Hotels (7.88), Mandarin Oriental (7.86), Leading Hotels of the World (7.77)

China: Leading Hotels of the World (8.62), Oberoi (8.57), The Luxury Collection (8.54), Firmdale Hotels (8.53), Raffles Hotels and Resorts (8.50)

Japan:Aman Resorts (8.19), Oberoi (7.83), Waldorf Astoria Hotels and Resorts (7.80), The Ritz-Carlton (7.73), Orient-Express Hotels (7.68)

“The luxury hotel industry is growing in potential, but also in the dramatic number of brands that have top tier offerings,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “The winners are those who can consistently provide remarkable guest experiences, as rated by the clients.”

Respondents reviewed the following hotel brands: Aman Resorts, Armani Hotels, Banyan Tree, Club Med, Como Hotels and Resorts, Conrad Hotels and Resorts, Fairmont Hotels and Resorts, Firmdale Hotels, Four Seasons, Grand Hyatt, InterContinental, Jumeirah, JW Marriott, Kempinski Hotels, Le Meridien, Langham, Leading Hotels of the World, Loews Hotels, The Luxury Collection, Mandarin Oriental, Oberoi, Orient-Express Hotels, Pan Pacific, Park Hyatt, The Peninsula Hotels, Raffles Hotels and Resorts, Regent, The Ritz-Carlton, The Rocco Forte Collection, Rosewood, Shangri-La Hotels & Resorts, Small Luxury Hotels of the World, Sofitel, St. Regis, Taj Hotels Resorts and Palaces, W Hotels and Resorts, and Waldorf Astoria Hotels and Resorts.

Contact the Luxury Institute for more details and complete rankings.

Visit us at www.LuxuryInstitute.com and contact us with any questions or for more information.

August 18, 2014

Convergent Wealth Advisors Shines as Luxury Wealth Manager

PRWeb
August 18, 2014

The Luxury Institute has announced Convergent Wealth Advisors as third out of 39 leading national wealth management companies and private wealth managers in their 2014 LBSI Wealth Management Survey. The survey asked affluent respondents nationwide to evaluate each firm based on such factors as service quality, exclusivity, social status, and the ability to deliver special client experiences.

Convergent’s expanding presence in the wealth management space comes at a time where investors demand more personalized attention. According to Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza, affluent individuals and families place expertise, trustworthiness, and generosity high on their list of attributes needed in order to build strong client relationships. Convergent embraces these attributes as part of its core values and corporate vision that underpin each client relationship.

“We believe that living well is the ultimate goal of investing well,” says Convergent President and COO Douglas Wolford. “The modern notion of luxury is defined by a sense of ease, confidence, and authenticity. Wealthy families want an experience tailored to their individual needs and goals—and one that allows them to enjoy more of the benefits and avoid many of the burdens of wealth.”

Dave Zier, CEO, adds, “People want to be associated with a luxury brand. Convergent strives to provide our clients with an experience that money alone can’t buy—an experience in living well. Being highly ranked by the Luxury Institute only reinforces our commitment to offering what we believe is the finest in wealth management.”

For the entire article click the link:http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12082567.htm

 

July 30, 2014

Atlantic Trust recognized as a top U.S. wealth management firm

PR Newswire
July 30, 2014

Firm ranked No. 1 for making clients feel special across the full customer experience, according to Luxury Institute survey

ATLANTA, July 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Atlantic Trust, the U.S. private wealth management division of CIBC (NYSE: CM) (TSX: CM), is pleased to announce it has been recognized as one of the top U.S. wealth management firms in the 2014 Luxury Brand Status Index™ (LBSI) Wealth Management survey.

“We are very pleased that our dedication to serving as a trusted advisor to our clients and their families is being recognized by this independent research,” said Jack Markwalter, chairman and CEO of Atlantic Trust. “Atlantic Trust is committed to providing investment excellence along with the highest quality client experience.”

Atlantic Trust received the second-highest luxury brand ranking among 39 wealth management firms in the U.S., according to a survey of investors with an average net worth of $15 million and an annual average income of $800,000 by the Luxury Institute, a New York-based research firm. Investors were asked to evaluate the firms on four LBSI components: quality, exclusivity, social status of clients and the ability to make clients feel special across the full customer experience. Each firm was assigned a score based on the responses.

Atlantic Trust ranked No. 1 for making its clients feel special across the full customer experience and rated near the top for delivering superior quality products and services consistently, being truly unique and exclusive, and having clients who are admired and respected.

Atlantic Trust also ranked as the firm that the ultra-wealthy are most willing to recommend to friends, family and people they care about.

The Luxury Institute’s ranking of Atlantic Trust as a leading U.S. wealth management firm is further validated by the firm’s strong client retention, steady inflow of assets from existing and new client relationships, and the addition of senior talent across the country.

Click the link to read the entire article: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/atlantic-trust-recognized-as-a-top-us-wealth-management-firm-269228641.html

July 23, 2014

UBS, Merrill Sink in Luxury Ranking as Rockefeller Reaches Top

By Danielle Verbrigghe
FundFire
July 23, 2014

Boutique wealth shops carry a much higher brand cachet than bigger firms among multimillionaires, according to a recent survey by the Luxury Institute. While Rockefeller Wealth Management rose to the top of the list, several of the biggest firms, including Merrill Lynch and UBS Private Wealth Management, continued an ongoing descent toward the bottom.

In the study, the Luxury Institute asked multimillionaires with an average net worth of $15 million and average annual income of $800,000 to evaluate wealth firms on factors including product quality, exclusivity, social status and ability to deliver special client experiences, and assigned firms a score based on the responses.

Rockefeller Wealth Management, a New York-based multi-family office, topped the list of highly ranked wealth managers. Coming second was Atlanta-based Atlantic Trust Private Wealth Management. Convergent Wealth Advisors was a close third, followed by First Republic Private Wealth Management and Bessemer Trust.

“Consumers are opting for boutique firms,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Wealthy consumers really value relationships and the smaller boutique firms really deliver.”

Some of the biggest firms meandered at the bottom or sunk lower. Merrill Lynch tumbled to last place out of 39 firms, while UBS Private Wealth Management came in second to last. Bank of America, Goldman Sachs and Charles Schwab rounded out the bottom five.

The brand reputation problem facing some of the largest firms is partially driven by legal and regulatory woes and other negative press coverage some of the brands attracted since 2008, Pedraza says. “Any time you have news that’s a negative in the media, these firms are going to get hit,” he says. “The larger firms took a beating.”

Other big brands, including, Citi Private Bank, Barclays Wealth, HSBC Private Bank and Wells Fargo also ranked in the bottom half of brands.

The rankings reflect general wealthy individual perceptions of overall brands, rather than specific client experiences, Pedraza ways. While the specific rankings tend to vary from year to year, quartile placement remains relatively stable, he says. This year’s results continue an ongoing trend of boutique wealth shops rising in the rankings and wirehouses and bigger firms sliding lower, he says.

While dropping slightly from its number three spot in 2013, Bessemer Trust made the top five list several years in a row. Brown Brothers Harriman, which took the top spot last year and in 2012, tumbled off the top five list. Northern Trust, Vanguard Personal Investors and J.P. Morgan Private Wealth Management also fell out of the top five.

Brown Brothers Harriman’s absence on the list doesn’t indicate an image problem, Pedraza says. “I don’t think it’s so much that they’re faltering as consumers perceive other brands to be better,” he says.

Boutique shops have an advantage over larger firms when it comes to creating a connection with wealthy investors, says Linda Beerman, chief fiduciary officer and head of wealth strategies for Atlantic Trust.

“Our clients feel they have an exclusive relationship with their client service representatives,” says Beerman. “It’s really a high-touch, client-service driven model.”

Offering unique experiences and hosting events is one way Convergent Wealth Advisors positions itself as a luxury brand, says Douglas Wolford, president and chief operating officer for Convergent Wealth Advisors.

“Wealthy people can find any number of people who are good investors, but what most wealthy people want is an experience,” Wolford says. “Boutiques provide that experience better than big companies.”

To differentiate themselves from other firms offering advice to ultra-high-net-worth and high-net-worth investors and families, Convergent offers special events for wealthy clients. For example, the firm is hosting an event in which wealthy clients can have lunch with David Rubenstein, co-founder and co-CEO of the Carlyle Group. Convergent has also held events for clients where wealthy investors get to drive new models of luxury vehicles, such as Ferraris or Bentleys, before they become available to the general public.

“We focus on trying to provide clients with experiences that money can’t buy,” says Wolford

Such experiences go a long way in attracting wealthy clients and enhancing the firm’s reputation as a luxury brand, Wolford says. “Convergent is a luxury brand and we take care to protect that as part of our image,” he says.

And that image has contributed to client development, according to Wolford.

Convergent Wealth Advisors has seen its Independence by Convergent unit, which caters to investors with between $1 million and $10 million in assets, grow in recent years, driven in part by brand perception, Wolford says. That division has added about 300 new high-net-worth clients over the past two years.

“The brand has really driven that growth. People want to be associated with a luxury, boutique brand,” says Wolford. “I think Convergent is an aspirational brand for people in Indepencence.”

Overall, wealthy individuals are apt to place a greater degree of trust in smaller, boutique firms, says Pedraza.

For brands at the bottom, “There’s only up they can go,” Pedraza says.

Click the link to read the entire article which includes quotes from Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute: http://fundfire.com/c/934734/9128/merrill_sink_luxury_ranking_rockefeller_reaches?referrer_module=emailForwarded&module_order=0

 

July 22, 2014

Luxury Institute Wealth Management Survey Shows Multimillionaires Favor Boutique Money Managers for Client Experience

(NEW YORK) July 22, 2014 – In the latest edition of its Luxury Brand Status Index Wealth Management (LBSI) survey, the independent and objective New York-based Luxury Institute asked investors with an average net worth of $15 million and annual average income of $800,000 to share detailed opinions of 39 leading firms in the wealth management business. LBSI scores (1-10) comprise respondents’ evaluations of each firm’s product quality, exclusivity, social status and ability to deliver special client experiences.

Set up in 1882 as the Rockefeller family office, New York-based Rockefeller & Co. earns the highest overall LBSI score of 7.94. Ranking closely behind Rockefeller & Co. are Atlanta-based Atlantic Trust Private Wealth Management (7.93), and Convergent Wealth Advisors (7.92). First Republic Private Wealth Management (7.82), Bessemer Trust (7.68) round out the top five.

“Wealthy clients tell us that expertise, trustworthiness and generosity are the critical elements in building strong client relationships in wealth management,” Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Successful wealth managers are relationship builders first, and, since few can beat the markets in the long run, money managers second.”

Additional firms evaluated include Ameriprise Financial, Bank of America, Barclays Wealth Management, BB&T Wealth Management, Bernstein Global Wealth Management, BMO Harris Private Banking, BNY Mellon Wealth Management, Boston Private Bank and Trust, Brown Brothers Harriman, Charles Schwab, Citi Private Bank, Credit Suisse Private Banking, Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management, Deutsche Bank Alex. Brown, Fidelity Investments, Fifth Third Private Bank, Goldman Sachs, HSBC Private Bank, J.P. Morgan Private Bank, J.P. Morgan Private Wealth Management, Merrill Lynch, Merrill Lynch Private Banking & Investment Group, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Wealth Management, National City Private Client Group, Neuberger Berman, Northern Trust, PNC Wealth Management, SunTrust Private Wealth Management, U.S. Bank Private Client Group, U.S. Trust, UBS Private Wealth Management, Vanguard Personal Investors, Wells Fargo Private Bank and Wilmington Trust Wealth Advisory Services.

Please visit www.LuxuryInstitute.com and contact us with any questions, or for detailed information about specific brand rankings.

The Luxury Institute, LLC

luxinfo@luxuryinstitute.com

May 2, 2013

Pentamillionaire Investors Reveal Whether 34 Top Firms Are Worth What They’re Paid To Watch Their Portfolios

(NEW YORK) May 2, 2013 – Affluent U.S. investors with at least $5 million in assets and $200,000 minimum annual income rate 34 national financial services firms in the Luxury Institute’s 2013 Luxury Brand Status Index (LBSI) wealth management survey. Wealthy individuals share opinions on each firm’s quality, exclusivity, social status and overall client experience.

Only 30% of firms achieved an overall LBSI score of 5.0 out of a possible 10.0, suggesting significant dissatisfaction from high-net worth investors with their wealth management providers. Brown Brothers Harriman earned the highest LBSI of 5.87.

“Especially in wealthy management, client relationships and trust can take years to cultivate and a short period to deteriorate,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Smart firms need to listen to what wealthy individuals are telling them to maintain brand reputation and client loyalty.”

Respondents ranked the following 34 wealth management firms, listed alphabetically:

  • Ameriprise Financial
  • Bank of America
  • Barclays Wealth Management
  • BB&T Wealth Management
  • Bernstein Global Wealth Management
  • Bessemer Trust
  • BMO Harris Private Banking
  • BNY Mellon Wealth Management
  • Boston Private Bank and Trust
  • Brown Brothers Harriman
  • Charles Schwab
  • Citi Private Bank
  • Credit Suisse Private Banking
  • Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management
  • Deutsche Bank Alex. Brown
  • Fidelity Investments
  • Fifth Third Private Bank
  • Goldman Sachs
  • HSBC Private Bank
  • J.P. Morgan Private Bank
  • J.P. Morgan Private Wealth Management
  • Merrill Lynch
  • Merrill Lynch Private Banking & Investment Group
  • Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Wealth Management
  • Neuberger Berman
  • Northern Trust
  • PNC Wealth Management
  • SunTrust Private Wealth Management
  • U.S. Bank Private Client Group
  • U.S. Trust
  • UBS Private Wealth Management
  • Vanguard Personal Investors
  • Wells Fargo Private Bank
  • Wilmington Trust Wealth Advisory Services

About Luxury Institute (www.LuxuryInstitute.com)
The Luxury Institute is the objective and independent global voice of the high net-worth consumer. The Institute conducts extensive and actionable research with wealthy consumers about their behaviors and attitudes on customer experience best practices. In addition, we work closely with top-tier luxury brands to successfully transform their organizational cultures into more profitable customer-centric enterprises. Our Luxury CRM Culture consulting process leverages our fact-based research and enables luxury brands to dramatically Outbehave as well as Outperform their competition. The Luxury Institute also operates LuxuryBoard.com, a membership-based online research portal, and the Luxury CRM Association, a membership organization dedicated to building customer-centric luxury enterprises.

 

September 22, 2012

Consumers’ Expectations High for Luxury Brands on Mobile

The highest percentage of high-end consumers expect luxury apps to include a loyalty program

eMarketer
September 21, 2012

Luxury brands have been slow to the mobile party, with marketers steering clients toward traditional brick-and-mortar locations where products could be displayed in elegant surroundings and customers were treated to an impeccable shopping experience. But luxury brands are making up for lost time, according to a new eMarketer report, “Luxury Marketing: Recreating the One-on-One Experience with Mobile.”

Click the link to read the entire article: http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1009366&ecid=a6506033675d47f881651943c21c5ed4

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