Luxury Institute News

October 30, 2014

October 14, 2014

WEALTHY AMERICANS RANK PREMIUM WINES, DIVULGE SPENDING AND DRINKING HABITS IN NEW LUXURY INSTITUTE SURVEY

Market Wired

NEW YORK, NY — (Marketwired) — 10/14/14 — More than two-thirds (70%) of wealthy U.S. consumers, under the age of 50, drink wine at least once a month, and they’re willing to pay premium prices for preferred vintages — an average of $48 per bottle at retail and $64 at a restaurant. These are among findings of the New York-based Luxury Institute’s just released Luxury Brand Status Index (LBSI) premium wines survey.

Consumers 21 and older from households with income of at least $150,000 a year evaluated 20 premium domestic wine brands on the degree to which each embodies the four “pillars” of brand value: superior quality, exclusivity, enhanced social status and an overall superior consumption experience. Respondents also reveal which wines are worth paying premium prices, which they would recommend to people close to them, and which brand they will buy next.

Based on overall 1-10 LBSI scores, Ghost Pines (7.65) earns top honors, and it ranks the highest on all four pillars of value. Known for California winemaker Michael Eddy’s multi-appellation blends of grapes from Napa, Sonoma, Monterey and San Joaquin counties, Ghost Pines is also the brand consumers deem most worthy of a price premium, even though many of its bottles sell for less than $20.

Other highly ranked premium domestic brands include Mount Veeder (7.39), Meiomi (7.30), Bridlewood (7.16) and Edna Valley (6.90).

“Winemaking is the quintessential luxury business in many ways,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Brand value begins with the best-quality raw materials and grows with fine craftsmanship and a relentless focus on execution and consistently delighting customers.”

Contact the Luxury Institute for more details and complete survey data.

Visit us at www.LuxuryInstitute.com and contact us with any questions or for more information.

The Luxury Institute, LLC
luxinfo@luxuryinstitute.com

Source:

http://www.einnews.com/pr_news/229093149/wealthy-americans-rank-premium-wines-divulge-spending-and-drinking-habits-in-new-luxury-institute-survey

October 4, 2014

Williams-Sonoma returns home to celebrate heritage

SFGate
Janet Fletcher
October 4, 2014

The store that introduced America to food processors and copper fish pans has returned to its Wine Country roots.

For many decades, Williams-Sonoma thrived by being one step ahead of its customers, selling them housewares they didn’t yet know they needed. But with this weekend’s opening of its newest venue, in Sonoma, the trendsetting company is looking back to celebrate its 99-year-old founder and recall its humble debut.

The project also reflects the Boomer-fueled brand’s efforts to woo a younger generation — Millennials, who aren’t exactly rushing to buy homes and stock kitchens.

This retro Williams-Sonoma, at the site of the original store, re-creates the look of the shop that Chuck Williams opened in 1956, down to the black-and-white checkerboard floor. “It’s going to be a total doppelganger,” said Wade Bentson, one of Williams’ first employees, who helped with its design.

With a 12-seat cooking school showcasing local talent, an edible garden, vintage merchandise and museum-style kitchenware exhibit, the store is opening in a town famously hostile to chains. But the billion-dollar retailer, for the most part, is being welcomed like a hometown hero.

“I’m totally excited about it,” said Sheana Davis, a community activist and proprietor of Epicurean Connection, a nearby cafe and cheese shop. “If you’re looking for opposition, I’m not it.”

Williams, who celebrated his 99th birthday this week, operated his store near the historic plaza for only two years before decamping to San Francisco. But his later success made Sonoma itself an international brand.

Visitors still inquire about the chain’s birthplace. “I’ve been introduced as his son several times,” said Steven Havlek, who owns Sign of the Bear, an independent kitchenware store on the plaza.

Re-creating the original

When the site at 605 Broadway became available in 2012, the retailer swooped in. The property included both Williams’ original 570-square-foot shop and an attached home and garden that he had shared with his mother.

“We found enough pictures and enough from (Williams) to rebuild the store exactly as it was,” said Janet Hayes, president of the Williams-Sonoma brand. The restoration includes original signage and the clean-lined open white shelving that became the stores’ trademark.

The new Sonoma store includes an exhibit of ingredients and tools that Williams popularized, such as Fini balsamic vinegar, Maldon sea salt, Le Creuset cookware and French mandolines. Williams’ restored home, attached to the store, has been repurposed as a design studio and showcase for Williams-Sonoma Home furnishings. The store is not all retro; the made-over garden boasts an outdoor kitchen with pizza oven and lots of merchandise from the company’s new Agrarian line, launched in 2012 in keeping with a younger generation’s fascination with urban farming.

The DIY cheese-making kits and high-end chicken coops that Williams-Sonoma is betting on today were definitely not in the mix when Williams began his retailing career. The society matrons who patronized Williams-Sonoma in the late 1950s were lured by the gleaming copper saucepans, Pillivuyt porcelain and fluted tart tins that Williams discovered in France. Jackie Kennedy and Julia Child were about to make French cuisine the epitome of chic, and Williams was poised to profit.

Cooking to entertaining

Urged by his affluent customers to move the shop to San Francisco, Williams listened when one of them suggested a spot near Elizabeth Arden, the high-end salon on Sutter Street. “In those days, women had beehive hair that required a lot of attention,” recalled Bentson, who began working for the store in 1961. “It wasn’t unusual for them to go to Arden’s two or three times a week, and they went right by our store.”

Women from Hillsborough, Piedmont and Marin would have their ball gowns shipped to Williams-Sonoma, drop their dogs off at the store, and then go and have their hair done, recalled Mary Risley, who founded Tante Marie’s Cooking School in San Francisco and is a longtime friend of Williams’. They bought Christmas presents and wedding gifts at Williams-Sonoma, especially after the merchant — again nudged by a customer — created a bridal registry to compete withGumps and Tiffany.

Child’s popular television show, which debuted in 1963, also fueled Williams-Sonoma’s sales. If Julia used it, “people beat the way to our store to get it,” Bentson said. San Francisco cooking teachers like Risley andJoyce Goldstein sent their students to the store for quiche pans, flan rings and souffle dishes — equipment that department stores of the day did not stock.

“Everybody was either taking cooking lessons or giving cooking lessons,” recalledJacqueline Mallorca, an early customer and ad agency employee who persuaded Williams that the store needed a mail-order catalog. Begun in 1972 and, for years, written by Mallorca, the innovative full-color mailer put Williams’ finds and favorite recipes within reach of all Americans.

Today, the recipes have migrated to the company’s website, and the catalog copy is far more clipped and concise. The September issue still includes Le Creuset and All-Cladcookware but also features packaged mixes for Bundt cakes, quick breads, waffles and breakfast bars — a shift noted unhappily by the culinary doyennes of San Francisco.

“There’s an awful lot of tableware,” sniffed Mallorca, an Englishwoman whose polished manners don’t conceal her dismay. “People today are not so interested in cooking as much as entertaining.”

Positioning for future

Goldstein, who later collaborated with Williams on several cookbooks, concurred. “At some point, Williams-Sonoma made the shift from being an educating store to being a lifestyle store, with tablecloths, napkins and pottery,” she said.

The publicly traded company’s other concepts — among them, Pottery Barn, Pottery Barn Kids and West Elm — are thriving, but the net revenue of the Williams-Sonoma brand has been stagnant in recent years and the store count is down. Branding experts and trend forecasters see both opportunities and challenges for the chain as it positions itself for the future.

Many affluent young consumers aren’t hurrying to buy homes, they say, and are more inclined to spend on experiences than on stuff.

“I’ve been invited to buy wedding gifts at experiential websites,” said Kara Nielsen, culinary director for Sterling-Rice Group, an advertising and branding agency in Boulder, Colo. Nielsen and others also point to a minimalist trend, a preference for smaller, less cluttered homes and simpler lives.

“A lot of Millennials believe in access but not ownership,” Nielsen said, pointing to the success of businesses that enable consumers to share cars or rent special-occasion clothes.

Building in diversity

Like other retailers, Williams-Sonoma needs to respond to changing demographics, marketing experts say. “Diversity has to be built into their product range and into their staff,” said Milton Pedraza, CEO of the Luxury Institute, a consultant to high-end brands. Pedraza points to his own multicultural family, which includes Colombians, a Jewish lawyer from Long Island and a Hindu doctor.

“We make samosas for Thanksgiving with turducken and Spanish rice,” he said. “And we’re not atypical.”

Marc Halperin, a food and beverage consultant with San Francisco’s Center for Culinary Development, believes the chain is still a tastemaker and sharp observer of trends. The Agrarian line dovetails neatly with the urban homesteading wave, Halperin said. And the shift toward offering tableware, juicers and other appliances that have little to do with cooking may also be wise.

“There’s clearly a huge understanding of the consumer,” Halperin said. “The number and variety of espresso machines they’re selling is mind-boggling.”

Janet Fletcher is a food writer and cookbook author in Napa. E-mail:home@sfchronicle.com

Company milestones

1956: First Williams-Sonoma store opens on Broadway in Sonoma.

1958: Chuck Williams moves his thriving cookware store to Sutter Street in San Francisco.

1972: Williams-Sonoma mails its first cookware catalog, with a print run of 10,000.

1973: Williams-Sonoma opens its second store, in Beverly Hills. Chuck Williams introduces the Cuisinart food processor, a revolutionary French appliance.

1978: Chuck Williams encounters balsamic vinegar in Italy and begins to import it.

1983: With its initial public offering, Williams-Sonoma becomes a publicly traded company to raise money for expansion.

1986: Williams-Sonoma releases its first cookbook, starting a hugely successful publishing program.

1999: Williams-Sonoma starts its e-commerce site.

2006: Debut of Williams-Sonoma Home, a furniture and home decor collection

2012: Williams-Sonoma starts Agrarian, a line of products designed for urban homesteaders.

2014: Williams-Sonoma opens its240th store in Sonoma, at the site of the original store.

Source: http://www.sfgate.com/homeandgarden/article/Williams-Sonoma-returns-home-to-celebrate-heritage-5800000.php

October 1, 2014

Statement Sweats Have Proved Their Staying Power

October 1, 2014
By Ruth La Ferla

Rita Ora was traveling quasi-incognito when she was snapped this year at Los Angeles International Airport wearing outsize shades, a blush-tone carryall, Air Jordans and a cushy sweatshirt, its hood pulled seductively over her brow.

Olivia Wilde recently strode the same passageways, the picture of ease in a biker coat … and sweatshirt, as did Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, who sallied toward the airport lounge wearing a dark fedora and … hey now, you know the refrain.

At the airport, a hub for the paparazzi, who tend to treat its fluid corridors as a makeshift red carpet, off-duty models and Hollywood A-listers have been flaunting their sweatshirts with careless élan, wearing versions embellished with eye-catching slogans, cartoons and jewels and pretty florettes or, alternately, opting for standard issue, raglan-sleeve varieties meant to signal, one suspects, that the wearer is just like you and me.

Clearly civilians relate, which may be why this cozy insignia of slacker chic, once reserved for furtive cigarette jaunts to the 7-Eleven or late nights on the sofa, binge-watching “Revenge,” has become the would-be style-setter’s trophy of choice, an item for all seasons — and occasions.

Its transition from nondescript wardrobe standby, the fashion equivalent of mac and cheese, to luxurious fashion mainstay now seems to have been all but inevitable. “The world of luxury has gone somewhat casual,” said Milton Pedraza, chief executive of the Luxury Institute, a consulting firm. “A lot of people don’t see sweatshirts as basic items anymore.”

Conversely, Mr. Pedraza noted, “a lot of basic items have gone premium.” He may have had in mind the sumptuous interpretations of this humble item that appeared on fall runways and are sold at Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom and Barneys New York and on upscale websites. Prices veer from $30 for an orchid-printed top by Altuzarra for Target to more than $4,400 for a Fendi version ornamented with fake fur, felt, swaths of mesh and crystal, but then, who’s counting?

Such gussied-up sweats can still play down one’s wealth while conferring enough raffishness to suggest that the wearer is too young, too prodigiously gifted or simply too chic to go in for a conventional 9-to-5 uniform. Indeed, these days the only thing inelegant about this once unexceptional garment is its name. And even that has had an upgrade.

Statement sweats, as they’re known in fashion-speak, emerged on the runways over two years ago, making their debut on the runway at Givenchy in the form of a photo-collage sweatshirt, followed last fall with a Bambi-print variation that became an instant fashion hit. The look gained traction in the spring with the parade of high-end sweatshirts at Theory, Kenzo and Alexander Wang, whose white shirt, cheekily inscribed with a “Parental Advisory” legend, was a fashion editor’s favorite.

Photo

Rita Ora moved through Los Angeles International Airport in fashionable sweats and accessories.

Sweats were reprised for fall at Rag & Bone, where a satin shirt was paired with paint-splatter jeans; at 3.1 Phillip Lim, with burnt-orange leather hoodies; and at Isabel Marant, where a lustrous camouflage shirt was shown with baggy fatigues. Surviving yet another season, they emerged for spring 2015 in a boxy version with cutoff sleeves at Jil Sander, covered in multihued sequins at Dsquared2, in a sunburst design at Fausto Puglisi, in silver at Norma Kamali and as a sleeveless top with an extravagant bow and as an evening dress at Bottega Veneta.

Like biker jackets, sneakers and skinny jeans before them, statement sweats have proved their staying power.

“Today it would be a misnomer to use the word ‘trend’ in reference to the sweatshirt,” said Tomoko Ogura, the senior fashion director at Barneys. Ever-evolving, it is now cut in sophisticated fabrics, including but by no means confined to cashmere, chiffon, organza, leather and lace, and offered in varying textures and shapes. So lavishly garnished are some that they are hard to place as sweatshirts at all. Yet consumers are responding, Ms. Ogura said, “because, while the designer’s hand is apparent, their utility is not compromised.”

Their utilitarian provenance is a talking point, indeed a boasting point, among luxury consumers who like to wear their shirts subversively with tuxedo pants or furs or, conversely, to throw on a sequin-encrusted versions to lend dazzle to their leggings or jeans. It’s like wearing a Casio watch with your Brunello Cucinelli cashmere pullover, suggesting a kind of inverse snobbery. “Like you’re playing the game without quite really playing the game,” Mr. Pedraza said.

In some quarters, sweatshirts, like sneakers, remain the great fashion leveler. Paraded this summer in men’s shows as diverse as Bottega Veneta, Neil Barrett and Lacoste, they seemed intended to mask distinctions of class and income or to render them obsolete. “Turns out,” as Guy Trebay noted in a New York Times fashion review, “Mark Zuckerberg didn’t need to outgrow his hoodie and shower shoes.” (Which is not to neglect those 99-percenters repurposing their gym togs as everyday wear in apparent deference to Gap’s recent injunction, in a series of fashion ads, to “dress normal.”)

“Sweatshirts flourish because they work for every demographic and every retail category — men’s, kids, junior contemporary and designer,” said Sheila Aimette, a vice president at the trend forecasting company WGSN. “They are cross-generational and cross-gender.”

Madeline Alford, a digital editorial assistant at Luckymag.com, has incorporated sweats into her workday regalia. Taking her style cues from the Lucky fashion staff, she may, on any given day, combine her black tubular jeans or leather midi-skirt with an oversize sweatshirt. “Instead of a chunky sweater, you could definitely wear a fleece,” she said, “something still warm and efficient.”

Function trumps showiness among Ms. Alford’s priorities. Fashion, she noted, has been gradually turning its back on the flamboyant extremes of street style in favor of a more accessible look. “Much as we love all that crazy, out-there style, it’s not for everybody,” she said.

Sweatshirts, on the other hand, merit her unstinting approval. “They’re what real women wear all the time,” she said.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/02/fashion/statement-sweats-have-proved-their-staying-power.html?_r=0 

May 23, 2014

60pc of affluent Baby Boomers inclined to use social media: report

By: Joe McCarthy
Luxury Daily
May 23, 2014

Generational distances regarding social media use are not as wide as commonly thought, according to a report from the Luxury Institute.

Eighty-five percent of millennials surveyed for the report said they were inclined to use social media, compared to 73 percent of Generation X’ers and 60 percent of Baby Boomers. As luddites become further marginalized, brands must adopt a marketing approach that prioritizes individuals over segments and personas.

“The surprising part for me is that Boomers, Gen X’ers and millennials are all consuming all of these media at some level,” said Milton Pedraza, CEO of The Luxury Institute, New York. “It’s not as if they’re getting left behind. These are all affluent people, and tech savvy.

“Life stage matters tremendously but because of the new age of data, analytics and one to one marketing, we can look beyond the segments to the individuals and market to them,” he said.

The Luxury Institute surveyed 1,200 consumers 21 and older with an annual household income of at least $150,000.

Less boundaries
The report aims to get marketers to reconsider media consumption in general. The dynamic of how consumers “consume” is messier than the laser-drawn segments of millennials, Gen X’ers and Baby Boomers suggests.

Age provides broad indications of consumer behavior, but individual behavior is more granular, rife with the unexpected.

Baby Boomers do watch more television, with respondents averaging seven hours per week, but millennials are also flipping through channels, with these respondents averaging four hours per week. About 70 percent of all segments surveyed watch previously recorded programs on DVR.

“Marketers need to go beyond stereotypes and propensities, and start doing real one-to-one marketing now,” Mr. Pedraza said in a press release. “The data and analytical firepower are there to build relationships, and wealthy consumers, especially millennials, demand it.”

“We have to look at individual needs, lifestyles and life stages and combine something that’s optimal for each person,” Mr. Pedraza said.

See full article with quotes from Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute: http://www.luxurydaily.com/60pc-of-affluent-baby-boomers-inclined-to-use-social-media-report/

March 6, 2014

Would You Pay 70 Per Cent More For Chanel?

By: Lauren Milligan
Vogue.com
March 5, 2014

IT’S not just the recession and higher property and living costs that’s making you think it, the price of luxury goods is actually rising. The Wall Street Journal reports that the price of a quilted Chanel bag has on average risen by 70 per cent in the past five years, while Louis Vuitton’s classic Speedy bag is 32 per cent more expensive in America than it was in 2009.

There are several theories behind the increases – which represent a general trend across the luxury goods industry, including watches and jewellery. Some say the prices are intended to help customers differentiate between the high-end brands and their increasingly popular mid-market competitors.

“The more Tory Burches and Michael Kors there are, the more the Chanels and Louis Vuittons will try to price up,” said Milton Pedraza, chief executive of the Luxury Institute, told the WSJ. Others explained that the price increases, although far outpacing inflation, were unavoidable in order to maintain quality – thanks to rising production costs.

Click the link to read the entire article: http://www.vogue.co.uk/news/2014/03/05/price-increases-for-luxury-items—chanel-louis-vuitton-bags

February 19, 2014

Jaguar takes over New York subway trains with Good to be Bad promotion

By Joe McCarthy
Luxury Daily
February 18, 2013

Jaguar Land Rover North America is targeting New York subway commuters with train takeover promotions for its Good to be Bad campaign.

The Good to be Bad campaign officially debuted during the Super Bowl Feb. 2, which makes it safe to assume that many of the commuters will recognize the slogan. Since one of the chief aims of the multichannel effort is to reposition the brand’s image, the venue will serve the purpose of attracting and holding the attention of significant numbers of consumers.

“As a general concept I would say that some of Jaguar’s target market goes on the subway, so I don’t think it’s illegitimate, but I do think that there are probably better places to spend your money,” said Milton Pedraza, CEO of The Luxury Institute, New York.

“Unless they just wanted to have us talk about the campaign, which we’re doing, then in that sense it becomes the antithesis of what someone might expect,” he said.

“When you get consumers to talk about the benefits of the brand, then you’re talking about relevant and reliable and positive awareness. When you just create a mild controversy, you’re going to get a mixed crowd.”

Mr. Pedraza is not affiliated with Jaguar, but agreed to comment as an industry expert.

Jaguar did not respond by press deadline.

Step inside
New York’s F Train travels from deep in Queens through Manhattan and down to Coney Island, Brooklyn. The F Train travels through the third busiest subway stop, Herald Square 34th Street, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Another attractive aspect of the F train for marketers is that it spends much of its time above ground.

The E train also experienced a Jaguar makeover, and this train travels through Times Square, the busiest stop in the system.

Overall, New York has the seventh busiest subway system in the world with an annual ridership of 1.665 billion.

What this means is that colossal amounts of people will see Jaguar’s promotion and perfunctorily register the message, especially since, in comparison, the other train exteriors will be far less spiffy.

However, the percentage of commuters who will be moved to buy a Jaguar is likely insignificant.

The brand’s intention may be to change the public’s perception rather than stimulate sales.

The “Good to be Bad” campaign centers on the idea that “British Villains” dominate Hollywood.

Sir Ben Kingsley, Tom Hiddleton and Mark Strong were tapped to play villains that muse on what makes British actors so attractive for villainous role. The subtext of the television spot is that the only car suited for these figures is the new F-Type.

Jaguar will likely extend this campaign for several months.

We will be moving shortly
Although it is hard to measure the direct impact of out of home advertising on sales, the medium attracts attention if positioned effectively.

Other luxury brands regularly turn to heavily trafficked transportation venues for outdoor advertising.

For instance, Swiss watchmaker Breguet took over the departures concourse of Geneva International Airport with an exhibit featuring its high-tech watches, the Type XXII 3880 and the Classique Chronométrie 7727.

Breguet’s exhibit, which ran in January, focused on the brand’s technical innovation in watch design and manufacturing along with the brand’s history with aviation. This exhibit drew attention because of its size, and Breguet was able to increase brand awareness among travelers, who are a captive audience.

Also, LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton eyed affluent travelers by placing brand advertisements on large digital screens at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York.

The screens displayed images from a number of LVMH brands including Christian Dior, Donna Karan, Marc Jacobs, Bulgari, TAG Heuer, Hennessy, Parfums Givenchy and Louis Vuitton.

Since the general reaction to an outdoor ad is unpredictable, brands must ensure that they unequivocally reflect key values.

“Usually, what I like to do is to create a campaign that talks about the benefits of the campaign,” Mr. Pedraza said.

http://www.luxurydaily.com/jaguar-takes-over-new-york-subway-trains-with-good-to-be-bad-promotion/

October 2, 2013

By Noon, These Two Will Have Brought In Another Half a Million More Dollars

By Paul Wachter
New York Magazine
October 1, 2013

One Kings Lane
Founded: 2009
Age of co-founders: 38 and 58
Most recent estimated valuation: $440 million
Lesson: Better than a deal on flatware is the perfect set delivered to your in-box.

The name emblazoned on the outer wall of 1355 Market Street, an Art Deco building ­in San Francisco completed in 1937, is a tribute to the past, not the ­present: Western Furniture Exchange and ­Merchandise Mart. As late as 2005, the premises housed 300 furniture wholesalers. By 2008, the number was down to 30, and the developer, brandishing city tax credits, made the sensible decision to re­invent the space for techies. Twitter moved in, followed by Microsoft-owned Yammer. Also came a company that can lay claim to the building’s former identity: One Kings Lane, an online purveyor of furniture and home accessories that is now projecting $300 ­million in annual revenue.

When I met the company’s co-founder, ­Alison Pincus, in One Kings Lane’s offices in late August, this historical symmetry went unmentioned. It wasn’t, I’m certain, because she was unaware, but rather because from the outset, she said, “we thought of One Kings Lane as always trying to be more than furniture.”

Click the link to read the entire article which includes multiple quotes from Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute: http://nymag.com/news/business/boom-brands/one-kings-lane-2013-10/?imw=Y&f=most-emailed-24h5

August 20, 2013

Wealthy Shoppers Enjoy Brand Partnerships, But Brand Dilution Is A Risk

(NEW YORK) August 20, 2013 – The Luxury Institute surveyed consumers with a household income of $150,000 or more about the appeal and impact of brand partnerships. These wealthy consumers also shared brands that they would be excited to see partner in the future.

Half of all affluent shoppers surveyed agree that the biggest risk for a luxury firm partnering with another brand—luxury or mainstream—is damage to the brand’s image or reputation. Joint advertising, products, events and sponsorships are the most effective types of collaboration.

Among the industries where partnerships are seen as most fruitful are hotels and resorts, travel, fashion and airlines.  Women are far more likely than men to applaud fashion partnerships, as well as those involving jewelry and beauty.  Men, on the other hand, are most enthusiastic about partnerships involving automobile companies.  Affluent shoppers older than 50 are exceptionally interested in airline and cruise collaborations.

Luxury brand collaborations wealthy shoppers would like to see include Michael Kors and Apple, Chanel and Air France, and Lexus and The Ritz-Carlton.  Missoni offering its fashions at Target and Vera Wang selling at Kohl’s are two high-profile examples of luxury brands partnering with a non-luxury outfit.  Affluent shoppers would like to see additional partnerships of this ilk, including Starwood Hotels and Resorts and Bed Bath & Beyond, Gucci and Coca Cola, among others.

“Brands should partner with companies with similar values and service standards to avoid potential risks of collaboration,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “This maintains credibility and helps to ensure a consistently positive customer experience.”

About Luxury Institute (www.LuxuryInstitute.com)
The Luxury Institute is the objective and independent global voice of the high net-worth consumer. The Institute conducts extensive and actionable research with wealthy consumers about their behaviors and attitudes on customer experience best practices. In addition, we work closely with top-tier luxury brands to successfully transform their organizational cultures into more profitable customer-centric enterprises. Our Luxury CRM Culture consulting process leverages our fact-based research and enables luxury brands to dramatically Outbehave as well as Outperform their competition. The Luxury Institute also operates LuxuryBoard.com, a membership-based online research portal, and the Luxury CRM Association, a membership organization dedicated to building customer-centric luxury enterprises.

August 15, 2013

Report: Even the wealthy love loyalty programs

Editorial
RetailCustomerExperience.com
August 14, 2013
In a new survey of affluent consumers by the Luxury Institute, wealthy shoppers earning at least $150,000 a year share detailed observations and evaluations of various loyalty and rewards programs, and offer suggestions for improvements to existing frequent shopper initiatives.Overall, 72 percent of wealthy consumers participate in some kind of loyalty program, with the most popular ones connected to credit cards, airlines, hotels and grocery stores. Men are significantly more likely to be members of airline and hotel rewards programs, while women are disproportionately represented in programs sponsored by grocery stores, drugstores and department stores. Previous Luxury Institute research has shown that Sephora, American Express and Amazon are the top three favorite rewards programs among affluent consumers.Very few respondents say that they belong to a luxury brand rewards program. The main perceived benefits of luxury brands’ loyalty programs are special offers and rewards, earning and redeeming points, and free goods and services. Free gifts carry more importance among women, shoppers under 50, and those with net worth less than $1 million.Satisfaction with existing loyalty programs is high and most high-income shoppers say that they have had positive experiences with their memberships. The vast majority of shoppers report that loyalty programs exert a strong influence over purchasing decisions.

http://www.retailcustomerexperience.com/article/217915/Report-Even-the-wealthy-love-loyalty-programs

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