Luxury Institute News

January 12, 2017

Should luxury retail move away from discounting?

Luxury Daily
Sarah Jones
January 12, 2017

Discounting is on the rise in the luxury sector, as retailers strive to make up for slowed spending by cutting prices.

The annual post-holiday sales are currently on, promising price cuts of up to 80 percent. While discounting may drive traffic and sales, is the hit to retailers’ positioning and profits worthwhile?

 “Luxury brands require strong leadership and vision to manage soft periods,” he said. “Weak brands discount when sales are weak. The trick is getting clients back without discounting.”

Reduced retail

A number of factors are making success in the luxury industry more difficult, and financial results are showing the challenging climate. From reduced tourist traffic to the slowdown in China, retailers are finding themselves needing to recoup sales.

According to a recent report from Bain, off-price retail is now 11 percent of the luxury market. While this segment of the sector grew less rapidly in 2016, it was still up by double digits.

Additionally, 37 percent of luxury sales today come from marked down merchandise (see story).

Luxury retailers including Nordstrom and Saks Fifth Avenue have aggressively expanded their off-price chains. Nordstrom Rack’s 215 stores far outnumber its 123 full-line stores, and Saks Off 5th similarly has 118 locations compared to the brand’s 41 full-line outposts.

 

Nordstrom ecommerce

Image courtesy of Nordstrom

“In the luxury boom of the mid-2000s, there was a lot of ‘aspirational luxury shopping,’ fueled by mass affluent and upper middle class consumers, rather than a traditional wealthy consumer,” said Steve Kraus, chief insights officer at Ipsos. “The attitude at the time was ‘I’m going to buy luxury, it’s going to be expensive and it’s going to be worth it.’

“With the recession, and continuing on afterwards, this aspirational luxury shopping has dried up, and the consumer mindset has become ‘I’m going to buy luxury, and I expect a deal,’” he said. “It’s the great paradox of the recession – it didn’t lower consumer expectations, it raised them.

“Value expectations are now a part of luxury in a way that they weren’t in the mid-2000s. Discounting is now widespread, in luxury and in mass markets, particularly as more and more shopping is done online.”

While many retailers limit their sales to specific times of the year, such as after the holidays, when they do cut prices it becomes the main event.

For the opening of the Harrods Sale on Boxing Day, the retailer traditionally pulls out the stops for the crowds gathering in line, passing around hors d’oeuvres and putting on a show.

Selfridges saw 1 million visits to its ecommerce site as its winter sale kicked off, and its stores pulled in $2.5 million in sales within the first hour of business on Dec. 26 (see story).

 

Harrods Sale promo

Promotion for Harrods sale

While the blowout sale at the end of a season is common practice among multi-brand retailers, some particularly tightly distributed labels avoid this strategy.

Louis Vuitton reportedly destroys merchandise that is unsold at the end of a season rather than selling it at a reduced price.

“In the long-term, I think success has come more to luxury brands who have not discounted–for example, Louis Vuitton, Hermès, etc.,” Mr. Kraus said. “They build their value equation around quality and heritage, rather than discounts.”

In general, luxury brands are trying to pull back and become more strategic in how they approach off-price.

For instance, U.S. fashion label Michael Kors has pulled back its inventory in department stores mainly to avoid its merchandise being placed on sale by its retail partners, protecting both its profits and image (see story).

 

Michael Kors

Image courtesy of Michael Kors

“Many brands are moving away from department stores due to their addiction to discounting,” Mr. Ramey said. “Discounting exists outside the ‘luxury code.’

“Luxury is about fantasy; price is about reality. Discounting price diminishes brand value,” he said. “Consumers demand value. Too many retailers define value as price.

“Successful luxury brands are disciplined. They must reinforce the brand narrative and create desire. No luxury brand has ever been built on price.”

Consumer behavior

Luxury brands often believe that their clientele will not be swayed by a deal, but this may not always be the case.

According to a report from Unity Marketing, the majority of affluent consumers employ a number of shopping and saving tactics to manage their money, with 52 percent of ultra-affluents regularly comparison shopping.

Luxury marketers often think that affluent consumers want to spend their money as fast as they earn it, but the affluent are actually invested in saving their money. These strategic spending habits call for a revised marketing plan that recognizes that consumers care more than previously thought about what they purchase (see story).

 

bloomingdales.athletic wear 400

Image courtesy of Bloomingdale’s

“Discounting illustrates the schism between a luxury buyer and an affluent buyer,” Mr. Ramey said. “The one commonality amongst the affluent is they save money.”

Similarly, the Luxury Institute’s Milton Pedraza noted in an interview with Luxury Daily that consumers are less loyal today, and they can be wooed by a better offer from a competitor (see story).

Keeping up with competitors is often the motivation behind retailer pricing strategies.

Upstream Commerce noted in a holiday report last year that high-end retailers were trying to cut back on promotions, but the industry at large puts pressure on them to follow trends. For instance, a brand may be sold at both a promotion-heavy chain such as Macy’s and a luxury department store, requiring the upscale retailer to match Macy’s or be passed over (see story).

“I think the problem is that luxury brands, like so many others, remain fixed on the old 4Ps model of marketing – product, price, promotion, placement – when where they need to focus is on the 4Es – experience, exchange, everyplace and evangelism,” said Pam Danziger, president of Unity Marketing, Stephens, PA.

“Luxury brands shouldn’t and shouldn’t need to rely upon discounting to sell their stuff,” she said. “The fact that they do only testifies how out of touch they are with the consumers and how badly they have failed at marketing in new luxury style.”

Source: https://www.luxurydaily.com/should-luxury-retail-move-away-from-discounting/

 

 

January 1, 2017

2017 U.S. Luxury Market: Will We See a Rebound?

The Wall Street Journal: Video
December 30, 2016

Spending on luxury goods and services were generally down in 2016. Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza joins Lunch Break with predictions for 2017 and whether a continued luxury spending downturn would mean trouble for the broader economy.

To see Milton Pedraza’s WSJ Lunch Break Interview, click the link here (source): http://www.wsj.com/video/2017-us-luxury-market-will-we-see-a-rebound/5AC3E7BE-F8F2-4AC0-A115-7ECF4FE086BA.html

December 8, 2016

SURVEY: AFFLUENT CUSTOMERS RATE JEWELERS AS PROVIDER OF TOP CUSTOMER SERVICE

The Israeli Diamond Industry
December 8, 2016
A new survey by the Luxury Institute, conducted among the top 10% earners in the US, the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and China, has found that quality and customer service are the two most important attributes that affluent consumers use to define a product’s luxury status. According to Gem Konnect, jewelry and hospitality brands have the best customer service staff, while real estate and designer shoes were rated the worst in that regard.

In addition, customers in the UK and US are more likely to rate customer service as a necessity for luxury than customers in Japan and China. Superior design ranks third in the list of luxury attributes, and it is more important to UK and US customers than in other countries.

59% of US respondents and 33% of respondents across the other six countries ranked superior craftsmanship in fourth place.

Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza said: “Half of the affluent consumers we just surveyed say that luxury sales associates deliver a personalised and relationship-oriented experience, which is encouraging, but it also suggests plenty of room for improvement when it comes to delivering a superior customer experience”.

Source: http://en.israelidiamond.co.il/News.aspx?boneId=918&objid=17706&cat=2

Why Sarah Jessica Parker is opening her first stand-alone store in a casino

After years of selling shoes and accessories at department stores, Sarah Jessica Parker announced this week that she is opening her first stand-alone boutique, a shoe-centric shop with $240 heels and $695 handbags.

But the location — inside a casino in Prince George’s County, on the outskirts of Washington — has left some, like market researcher Pam Danziger, stumped.

“It doesn’t make sense to me,” said Danziger, whose work focuses on affluent consumers.

Why not New York? she wondered. The city has become synonymous with Parker since her run as the star of “Sex and the City.” Even a dozen years after its airing, the show remains so popular that people still line up to take tours of the characters’ hot spots around town. Parker herself lives in the West Village.

“It is a bit surprising,” said Michael Isen, senior vice president at NAI Michael, a commercial real estate brokerage in Lanham. “That someone like Sarah Jessica Parker wants to open their first store in Prince George’s County speaks volumes.”

 The SJP by Sarah Jessica Parker store, which debuts next week at the MGM National Harbor, will open alongside a Louis Vuitton store and restaurants by prominent chefs including José Andrés and Marcus Samuelsson. The property will also have a 125,000-square-foot casino, a spa and salon, and 308 hotel rooms.

“I’m sure it boils down to: MGM just made an incredibly good deal,” Danziger said. “She’s getting prime real estate with the potential for a lot of traffic, likely for very little money.”

To understand why Parker might have ended up in Prince George’s County, Milton Pedraza of the Luxury Institute says it makes sense to look at the state of the retail industry. Luxury retailers, from Burberry to Prada, are struggling to get people into their stores. Spending is down, and traffic to high-end shops has slipped 20 percent.

“In short, there is a crisis sweeping the premium and luxury retail market today,” Pedraza said. “So why not go out on a limb and do something paradoxical? Consumers are tired of the same old, same old.”

There are, he said, a number of factors in Parker’s favor: The Washington suburbs are home to six of the country’s 10 wealthiest counties (although Prince George’s County isn’t one of them). And the casino, which opens Thursday, is likely to draw large crowds of locals, as well as tourists, looking for glitz and glamour.

“She will have a high-end, captive audience that is looking to splurge,” Isen said.

To be sure, Parker isn’t the first to open an inaugural store in the outskirts of Washington. A number of big-name companies, including Apple and Spanx, opened their first local retail stores outside of the District. (Both chose locations at the Tysons Corner Center shopping mall.)

[Spanx opens first retail store in Tysons Corner]

It isn’t uncommon for retailers to test the waters in a lesser-known suburban market before opening up in a more-visible location such as New York or Los Angeles, says Marshal Cohen, a retail analyst for market research firm NPD Group.

“If it doesn’t work, very few people will notice,” he said. “You can just close up and move on and nobody is the wiser.”

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2016/12/08/why-sarah-jessica-parker-is-opening-her-first-retail-store-in-a-casino/?utm_term=.1a32d584f6ff

December 7, 2016

Affluent millennials interested in purchasing luxury goods drops 15pc: report

Luxury Daily
December 7, 2016
By: Brielle Jaekel

 

Travel & Leisure May 2015

Travel experiences are proving to be dramatically more important to affluent millennials, with most interested in hotel accommodations and flight tickets rather than luxury goods.

A recent report from Agility showed that across the globe the majority of prosperous millennials are likely to travel abroad in the next year. Percentages in China, India, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan are all above 71 percent for those interested in abroad travel over the next 12 months.

“Millionaires in Asia are young and many of them in our study are in the millennials age group,” said Amrita Banta, managing director at Agility Research & Strategy. “Travel is the new luxury in Asia amongst this profile of consumers and we see that the appetite for travel has increased this year from the last year but the appetite to buy luxury goods has definitely decreased in our sample.”

The study interviewed 922 affluent millennials from China, India, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, South Korea and Taiwan.

Affluent consumers
Agility’s Asian Millennial and Millionaire Research Results shows there will likely be a decline in luxury retail in Singapore in the upcoming new year, as there has been a 15 percent drop in millennial interest in spending more with luxury goods.

 

Omega.Singapore2

Singapore shoppers

Luxury hospitality brands might have an opportunity to expand into luxury lodges and winter apparel and accessories in Asia. Findings are showing an increase interest in skiing.

Other hobbies such as wine tasting and fine dining are making an impression on affluent Chinese consumers. More than 51 percent were interested in wine tasting and 48 percent in fine dining.

 

Peninsula Academy Chinese consumer

Chinese shoppers

However, while passion for spending more on luxury goods is dropping, interest in shopping in general is still strong. More than 69 percent of Chinese consumers are interested in shopping as a hobby.

Behaviors in luxury
Another study noted that millionaires from the X generation held onto traditional luxury events while millionaire millennials are straying away from happenings such as fashion shows and auto races, according to a new report from Shullman Research Center.

While there are vast differences in culture, behavior and values between lower income consumers versus millionaires, this also holds true for differing generations. For instance, family is the top priority in millionaire Gen-Xers’ lives with 89 percent believing so, but only 67 percent of millionaire millennials say the same (see more).

Also, quality tops attributes such as craftsmanship and service as the number one defining attribute affluent consumers use to discern a good’s luxury status, according to other research by the Luxury Institute.

Behind quality comes customer service, which more than half of consumers mentioned as a characteristic they associate with luxury. Despite global trends, residents of individual nations have varied priorities when it comes to luxury goods, with differing sentiments towards the value of products (see more).

“Asian millionaires are now discovering new interests like fine dining and wine tasting – this year we see activities like Skiing in the slopes of Japan becoming popular with the Singaporean millionaires for instance,” Ms. Banta said.

Source: https://www.luxurydaily.com/affluent-millennials-interested-in-purchasing-luxury-goods-drops-15pc-report/

 

 

December 6, 2016

Fashion shows prove less important to affluent millennials: Shullman

Luxury Daily
By: Brielle Jaekel
December 6, 2016

Affluent millennials

Millionaires from the X generation hold onto traditional luxury events while millionaire millennials are straying away from happenings such as fashion shows and auto races, according to a new report from Shullman Research Center.

 While there are vast differences in culture, behavior and values between lower income consumers versus millionaires, this also holds true for differing generations. For instance, family is the top priority in millionaire Gen-Xers’ lives with 89 percent believing so, but only 67 percent of millionaire millennials say the same.

“When luxury marketers and their agencies think about how to reach and potentially communicate their messages to millionaires in ways beyond the traditional and digital media channels, they need to realize that millionaires are a materially different breed of consumer— different not only from those with fewer financial resources, but also from one another generationally,” said Bob Shullman, CEO of Shullman Research Center. “Marketers of luxury products and services who are not knowledgeable about these differences do so at their own and their company’s peril.

“Notably, from our perspective, it is surprising how different millionaire Gen-Xers are in their sporting, lifestyle and cultural interests compared with millennial and boomer millionaires,” he said.

The research was conducted online that surveyed 1,690 respondents with household incomes of at least $75,000.

Differing values
The differences between millionaire millennials and Gen-Xers are also displayed in their varying interests in sports. Millennials are more interested in adventure-like sports such as snorkeling, jogging and rollerblading while Gen-Xers are interested in traditional affluent sports such as tennis and golf.

Necker Cup tennis 3

Affluent Gen-Xers value tennis

Only 19 percent of millionaire millennials plan to play tennis in the next year, whereas 45 percent of Gen-Xers are likely to play. However, 24 percent of affluent millennials claim to be planning to snorkel in the next year while only 2 percent of Gen-Xers are likely to.

Millennials who are millionaires are also more interested in painting and the arts compared to their predecessors. About 26 percent of millennials are interested in painting and drawing compared to 13 percent of Gen-Xers.

However, baby boomers are almost as interested in painting as millennials, with 24 percent.

Giorgione painting

Giorgione painting

Interest in museums is completely disconnected throughout generations. Forty-two percent of baby boomers are interested in museums, but only 9 percent of generation X and 10 percent of millennials are interested.

More insight
Quality over price is exceedingly important when it comes to millionaires and affluent Americans. For instance, 83 percent of all generations value quality over price when deciding on purchases.

This is also true for 96 percent of millennials, 81 percent of Gen-Xers and 75 percent of baby boomers.

Other research by the Luxury Institute showed that quality tops attributes such as craftsmanship and service as the number one defining attribute affluent consumers use to discern a good’s luxury status.

Behind quality comes customer service, which more than half of consumers mentioned as a characteristic they associate with luxury. Despite global trends, residents of individual nations have varied priorities when it comes to luxury goods, with differing sentiments towards the value of products (see more).

The drastic shift in consumer behavior from the rapid evolution of technology has resulted in a 20 percent drop in customer spend with luxury brands, according to another Luxury Institute.

Luxury Institute’s “2016 State of the Luxury Industry” report shows that consumers are spending much less in the luxury market compared to two years ago, but luxury marketers will have an uphill battle to determine how to combat this. While digital and mobile avenues are vital to success for any retailer or brand, it seems that affluent consumers are interested more in shopping with luxury brands at bricks-and-mortar locations (see more).

“We were very surprised by how much more millionaire Gen-Xers are into attending fashion and trunk shows and auto races compared with millennial millionaires (for example, 35 percent of Gen-Xer millionaires are into attending auto races compared with 1 percent of millennials while 36 percent of the Gen-Xers attend fashion and trunk shows while only 7 percent ofmMillennials attend these shows),” Mr. Shullman said.

Source: https://www.luxurydaily.com/fashion-shows-prove-less-important-to-affluent-millennials-shullman/

December 2, 2016

55pc of affluents deem luxury prices unjustified by product value

Luxury Daily
By: Staff Reports
December 2, 2016

Image courtesy of Printemps 

Quality tops attributes such as craftsmanship and service as the number one defining attribute affluent consumers use to discern a good’s luxury status, according to new research by the Luxury Institute.

Behind quality comes customer service, which more than half of consumers mentioned as a characteristic they associate with luxury. Despite global trends, residents of individual nations have varied priorities when it comes to luxury goods, with differing sentiments towards the value of products.

Luxury Institute’s survey was conducted in the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and China, with respondents from about the top 10 percent of earners in their respective countries.

Divided priorities

Customers in the U.K. and the U.S. are more apt than respondents from Japan and China to mention superior customer service as a necessity for luxury. A superior design ranks third, but those in the U.K. and U.S. mention it more frequently than those from other countries.

While superior craftsmanship comes in fourth among global consumers, this attribute is mentioned by 59 percent of U.S. residents, compared to 33 percent across the other six nations.

Personalized offers, loyalty programs and value add-ons were mentioned by less than a quarter of consumers, but those who do define luxury by these points are inclined to say they are improving.

There is a disparity about the general quality of luxury goods. Those in China and Italy are more likely to report improvement in quality, while those in the U.S. are more apt to believe that luxury goods’ quality is declining.

When considering the ideal front line staff in a luxury boutique, courtesy and politeness are most important to affluent shoppers. Product expertise is a close second, with more than half saying they look for this knowledge in the associates they deal with.

 

Hugo Boss On Demand

Boss on Demand

The survey participants mentioned jewelry and hospitality brands as having the best customer service staff, while real estate and designer shoes got the least nods for their quality of service.

“From our numerous one-on-one discussions with luxury CEOs, we’ve often heard that a majority of success stems from superior products, but the rest depends on relationship-building expertise and execution of front-line teams,” says Milton Pedraza, CEO of the Luxury Institute. “Half of affluent consumers we just surveyed say that luxury sales associates deliver a personalized and relationship-oriented experience, which is encouraging, but it also suggests plenty of room for improvement when it comes to delivering a superior customer experience.

Even with the rise of digital channels, frontline sales staff are far from obsolete, according to results of a survey conducted by InMoment.

The bricks-and-mortar shopping experience no longer exists in a vacuum, with consumers arriving at a store armed with information from research conducted before or even during their trip. However, while shoppers spend about twice as much in-store when they navigate to a brand’s Web site while shopping, their expenditures grow to four times more if they interact with both an associate and the brand’s Web site while in-store (see story).

Source: https://www.luxurydaily.com/55pc-of-affluents-deem-luxury-prices-unjustified-by-product-value/

 

November 1, 2016

Affluent consumers to decrease luxury market spend, says Luxury Institute

Luxury Daily
November 1, 2016
By: Brielle Jaekel

The drastic shift in consumer behavior from the rapid evolution of technology has resulted in a 20 percent drop in customer spend with luxury brands, according to the Luxury Institute.

 Luxury Institute’s “2016 State of the Luxury Industry” report shows that consumers are spending much less in the luxury market compared to two years ago, but luxury marketers will have an uphill battle to determine how to combat this. While digital and mobile avenues are vital to success for any retailer or brand, it seems that affluent consumers are interested more in shopping with luxury brands at bricks-and-mortar locations.

The report surveyed 3,900 affluent consumers from the U.S., U.K., Europe, Japan and China, all of which made higher than $150,000 USD, £60,000, EUR50,000, 1 million CNY and Japan ¥150 million.

 Consumer habits

Luxury spending in the United States is ahead of many other countries, but the United Kingdom and Italy are leading the pack. The average spend within the luxury market in Italy is expected to be $17,660, $16,715 in the U.K. and $16,360 in the U.S.

Brands must now focus on how to properly balance ecommerce initiatives and in-store strategy to appeal to the modern affluent U.S. consumer. Bricks-and-mortar are making a slight comeback with 54 percent of high-net-worth individuals preferring to shop in store for luxury brands, compared to only 49 percent two years ago.

Hugo Boss New York Fifth Ave store 400

Social media is now the main avenue luxury fashion brands are using to communicate with consumers for customer service, with 58 percent leveraging Facebook Messenger, according to another report from L2.

Traditional customer service communication platforms are tired and outdated, and consumers now expect a more modern method for reaching out to brands and retailers. Many brands are taking note and launching communication methods on mobile messaging platforms such as Facebook Messenger, with 71 percent of watch and jewelry brands following suit (see more).

The growth of the luxury market is slowing, with only 19 percent of high-income individuals planning to spend more within the next year, compared to the 30 percent from two years ago.

While growth will slow, many U.S. consumers are still planning to spend on luxury goods and services. For instance, 92 percent of affluent consumers in the U.S. plan to spend money on luxury brands within the next 12 months.

The average anticipated spend per consumer is estimated to be $16,360, dropping almost $4,000 from $20,085 in 2014.

Luxury sectors

Watches, fine art, handbags, home appliances and jewelry are likely to be the areas hurt the most from the cut back. About 33 percent of consumers claiming to cutback on spend with watches, 28 percent on art, 24 percent on handbags and home appliances and 23 percent on jewelry.

Michael Kors Access smartwatch

However, travel remains as the dominating sector in which U.S. consumers with high incomes will be spending with luxury brands.

Hilton-owned Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts climbed the ranks in terms of international brand awareness, despite consumers spending less time traveling, according to another report from Luxury Institute.

JW Marriott, InterContinental, Four Seasons, Grand Hyatt and The Ritz-Carlton maintained their places as the most visited hotel brands, reported last year and this year in the LBSI Global Hotel study. However, affluent consumers are cutting down on hotel stays with modest decrease in number of nights stayed (see more).

“The biggest surprise is that while ecommerce is critical to success in luxury, slightly more consumers still prefer the store experience,” Mr. Pedraza said. “Additionally luxury consumers are following less, not more, luxury brands on social media.

“As millennials mature they are recognizing that they have to focus on careers and relationships, not just social media,” he said.

Source: https://www.luxurydaily.com/affluent-consumers-to-decrease-spending-in-luxury-marketers/

October 22, 2015

She Who Controls the Purse Strings

IDEX
October 22, 2015
By: Danielle Max

There’s good news from a recent survey released by the Luxury Institute, which revealed that watch and jewelry companies are more successfully marketing to affluent women these days. In fact, 62 percent of respondents said that these companies do a good job of marketing to them; up from 53 percent in 2012.

The research from the New York-based Luxury Institute ranks industries and specific brands based on their success marketing to women with a minimum household income of $150,000 per year. Respondents reported average household income of $289,000, and a $2.9 million average net worth, so these are exactly the sort of households that the diamond and jewelry industries need to be targeting.

Overall, the watch and jewelry category ranks fifth among industries trying to sell their goods to women – and, given that high-ticket items such as watches and jewelry are not exactly a spur of the moment purchase – that seems pretty good to me.

The top four industries most frequently viewed as doing a good job marketing to women from high-income households through advertising and social media are clothing (75%), shampoos and conditioners (74%), fragrances and cosmetics (72%) and shoes (72%).

And it seems that marketeers overall are doing a better job of selling to what is clearly a key demographic. The Luxury Institute says that compared to 2012, each of these categories enjoys a wider share of women who view their marketing efforts favorably.

However, lest you think the gender gap is a thing of the past, among the industries that affluent women say are doing the poorest jobs of marketing to them are insurance, liquor, electronics, banks, brokerages and private jets, each of which earns an approval rating of less than 5 percent and has fallen in approval since 2012.

In addition, the automobile industry also needs to stop thinking (and acting as if) men hold the purse strings. Apparently, only 6 percent of women are impressed by the efforts of car companies to market to them.

Of course, it’s not just money that comes into play in such issues. According to the research, affluent women in the 45-64 age bracket are much more likely than women under the age of 45 to say that companies are doing well in marketing specifically to them.

Part of the problem seems to be that companies just don’t seem to realize who they should be targeting. The Luxury Institute specifically singles out married women who, according to its research, make two-thirds of all household purchasing decisions.

“Women maintain huge economic power and it is a necessity for companies to step up marketing and how they connect with affluent women regardless of industry,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Research that includes speaking directly with these women about what appeals to them and what turns them off removes much of the guesswork in making marketing decisions.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Have a fabulous weekend.

Source: http://www.idexonline.com/Memo?Id=41250

Women neglected by marketers despite making two-thirds of household purchases

Luxury Daily
October 22, 2015
By: Staff Reports

Brands in the apparel, personal care and footwear sectors are among the best at marketing to affluent women, according to research by Luxury Institute.

The best industries targeting affluent women through advertising and social media do not come as a surprise, but it does shine a light on the sectors that are not doing well at focusing their attentions on this demographic of wealthy consumers. Survey respondents felt that the industries doing the least to target affluent women include insurance, liquor, consumer electronics, banks and brokerages and transportation including automobiles and private jets.

Luxury Institute surveyed women ranging in age from 21-years-old to more than 65-years-old with a household income minimum of $150,000 per year. The respondent pool’s had a reported average household income of $289,000, and a $2.9 million average net worth.

A battle of the affluent sexes
When it comes to marketing to a female demographic, brands in apparel (75 percent), shampoos and conditioners (74 percent), fragrances and cosmetics (72 percent) and footwear (72 percent) unsurprisingly fared the best.

In regard to the industries that are failing at capitalizing on the purchasing power of affluent women, each had an approval rating of less than 5 percent. This approval rating has continued to fall since 2012.

Efforts put forth by automotive brands, for instance, have only impressed 6 percent of the female respondents. Although traditionally associated with a masculine culture, the auto industry should expand its marketing efforts to cater to the sentiments of its female consumers, especially those with families, by touting the safety of high-end vehicles.

On the corporate side, automakers have made strides in being more inclusive of females in general. For instance, British automaker Aston Martin looked to close the gender gap in engineering by teaming up the Royal Air Force to introduce female students to various career routes (see story).

Sectors improving outreach to female consumers include the jewelry and watch sector, which has seen the largest improvement over the past three years. Sixty-two percent of respondents felt that these brands do a good job marketing to their demographic, a 53 percent increase from 2012.

In addition, department stores are listed sixth, with 60 percent of affluent women appreciating the efforts put forth by retailers.

Lux institute.womens marketing graph
Graph provided by Luxury Institute 

Across the board, older affluent women aged 45-64 felt that brands across industries are doing well when marketing to their demographic. This response was much more likely from the older age group than it was for women 45-years-old and under.

But, 25 percent of women 21- to 44-years-old felt that the wine industry is not doing enough, or not marketing to them well enough. This propensity decreases with age, with 21 percent of 45- to 54-year-olds, 16 percent of those between the ages of 55 and 64 and 12 percent ages 65 or older approve of the wine category’s marketing efforts.

In a statement, Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza said, “Married women tell us that they make two-thirds of all household purchasing decisions. Women maintain huge economic power and it is a necessity for companies to step up marketing and how they connect with affluent women regardless of industry. Research that includes speaking directly with these women about what appeals to them and what turns them off removes much of the guesswork in making marketing decisions.”

Source: http://www.luxurydaily.com/women-neglected-by-marketers-despite-making-two-thirds-of-household-purchases/ 

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