Luxury Institute News

June 11, 2015

Hotels Offer Luxury Shopping Inside Your Rooms

The New York Times
By: Shivani Vora
June 10, 2015

Luxury hotels are increasingly partnering with high-end retailers to give guests insider shopping experiences and perks. Many of these collaborations are at properties in New York.

The Mark Hotel on Manhattan’s Upper East Side has teamed with Bergdorf Goodman: Guests are ferried to and from the Fifth Avenue store in pedicabs and have access to shop before and after hours with Bergdorf’s director of shopping. Those staying in a suite receive a $500 gift card and a facial in the store’s beauty department. Rooms from $725, suites from $1,200.

The Quin in Midtown is also working with Bergdorf’s. The phones in each of the hotel’s 208 rooms have a direct-dial button to the store’s personal shopping team, which can set up appointments for a store visit and can order items to be delivered to guests. Terrace suite guests also receive a $300 gift card. Rooms from $499, suites from $2,000.

Travelers who stay three or more nights in a suite at the WestHouse in Midtown receive a $500 gift card to the online fashion retailer Net-a-Porter and can talk with the company’s personal shoppers by pushing a button on in-room phones. Suites from $999.

The St. Regis Washington, D.C. offers guests an opportunity to stock their room closets ahead of time with items from Neiman Marcus. Those interested answer a questionnaire about their style preferences and arrive to a find a customized wardrobe. The service is free, and guests can try on the clothes. There is no obligation to buy them unless the clothes are worn. Rooms from $395.

International hotels are also participating: Travelers staying a minimum of five nights in a suite at the Madinat Jumeirah in Dubai until the end of July receive a free pair of shoes from Harvey Nichols as well as a pedicure. Suites from $800.

These relationships are a way for stores to generate traffic and also appeal to travelers, according to Milton Pedraza, the founder of the New York-based luxury research and consulting firm the Luxury Institute. “Retailers and hotels assume that if you’re staying at a pricey property, you have the means and inclination to shop, and these partnerships give you an incentive to do that with a specific name,” he said.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/10/travel/hotels-offer-luxury-shopping-inside-your-rooms.html?_r=0

June 8, 2015

Cadillac to Sponsor First-Ever New York Fashion Week for Men ‘I Am Very Much Interested in Taking Cadillac Into the World of Fashion’

Advertising Age
June 5, 2015

While the New York womens’ collections have failed to land a car company to replace longtime title sponsor Mercedes-Benz, Cadillac has signed on to become the first-ever automotive backer of New York Fashion Week: Men’s.
The agreement, signed to last two seasons, includes producing a variety of related events and providing Cadillac vehicles as shuttles for attendees. Shinola, Amazon Fashion, and Dreamworks have also been confirmed as sponsors for the fashion week focusing on menswear.

“I am very much interested in taking Cadillac into the world of fashion,” Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen said. “The whole idea of beginning to strengthen Cadillac’s position as a lifestyle brand is very much central to our mission. This is a good start.”

“It should be interpreted as a clear statement of intent that we will walk with a heavy footstep in the fashion world,” he said.

In addition to the role during men’s fashion week, Cadillac will continue as a presenting sponsor of New York Men’s Day, a special day formerly set aside during the womenswear-heavy New York Fashion Week to highlight emerging menswear designers. This year, that day will move to July in order to align with NYFW: Men. This will be the second season that Cadillac participates.

The new deal is a telling move from a 113-year-old brand that was reportedly considering the title sponsorship of what was formerly Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, which primarily showcases womenswear. Mercedes-Benz ended its title role there earlier this year; the twice-annual event has suffered a deficit of energy since moving from Bryant Park to Lincoln Center in 2010. Many fresh, new fashion brands started showing their wares at off-site locations — often involved with Made Fashion week.

Earlier this year, Cadillac hosted arguably the hottest ticket during New York Fashion Week, when it allowed Public School to show its Autumn/Winter 2015 menswear and womenswear collection in the automaker’s new offices, situated between Tribeca and the West Village.

“We evaluated New York Fashion Week, and we continue to think it’s a worthy property,” Mr. de Nysschen says. “But we weren’t ready to figure out how to fully integrate that into our overallmarketing strategy.”

Cadillac’s decision to sponsor men’s fashion week (which is backed by the Council of Fashion Designers of America), rather than New York Fashion Week, speaks to its desire to return to the cutting edge of culture. In recent years, the automaker has struggled to revitalize its fuddy-duddy image; last year the average buyer of a Cadillac was 59.5 years old, according to the global information company IHS Automotive — much older than the thirties to early forties age range most desirable to luxury brands.

The men’s week sponsorship is totally new — a first. It’s an essential first at that, industry insiders say.

“Cadillac needs that cool, fashionable, ‘gets it’ association to appeal to all consumers, especially Gen Xers and Millennials, who still have a perception of an older brand,” Milton Pedraza, chief executive officer of the New York City- based Luxury Institute, said via e-mail from Stockholm.

New York Fashion Week: Men’s runs July 13-16 at Skylight Clarkson Square in downtown Manhattan. A spokesman for Cadillac declined to disclose the amount of the new sponsorship.

Source: http://adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/cadillac-sponsor-york-fashion-week-men/298907/?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social

June 5, 2015

When is Luxury not Luxury?

PYMNTS
June 4th, 2015

When Lilly Pulitzer released an exclusive line for Target in April, the entire collection sold out at some physical locations within hours. Good for the designer, good for the store, good for the buyers. A resultant Target website crash aside, good for everybody…right?

“No target shouldn’t collaborate with Lilly just no ew ew ew keep Lilly Pulitzer classy people” – Katherine (@kathhlambert)

“lilly pulitzer collaborating with target is probably the worst news I will get in all of 2015” – Marisa Lyn Friedman (@marisalynnnn)

“Lilly pulitzer for target?! Holy hell What’s next?! the apocalypse??! affordable clothing for the masses!? Disgusting” – Pamela Beesly (@trillprincess47)

Those tweets (the third of which, c’mon, has to at least be partially sarcastic) went out not after “Lilly Pulitzer for Target” was released, but actually when the line was first announced, back in January.

The perception among Lilly Pulitzer devotees outspoken in their disapproval of the Target collaboration, then and now, seems to be that the value of Lilly Pulitzer clothing (and other items) is directly related to their cost. And if the cost goes down (Lilly Pulitzer dresses, which often sell for $200, were available at Target for $40), the brand itself diminishes in value.

It wasn’t only semi-anonymous Twitter users who expressed their disdain for Lilly Pulitzer’s availability to bargain shoppers. In an op-ed for Bloomberg, columnist Megan McArdle – having expressed her belief that Lilly Pulitzer clothes are in fact quite ugly and worn only as a statement by people too rich to care – wrote that “actually wearing Target’s Lilly Pulitzer line…signals the exact opposite of what it is supposed to.” That is to say, if you had to make an effort to buy those clothes, you don’t really deserve to wear them.

Crossovers between high-end brands and mass-market retailers – and the potential image risk to the former – are by no means a new phenomenon. In 1983, the designer brand Halston released a collection exclusive to J.C. Penney, and lost some luxury partnerships as a result.

Halston’s experience aside, the particular backlash to the Lilly Pulitzer/Target collaboration seems a bit out of step with the norm, as Target’s own partnerships with brands like Isaac Mizrahi and, as recently as this year, Missoni, or the recently-announced deal between H&M and Balmain, did not raise such a volume of ire among self-appointed consumer protectors of the luxury ideal.

While there is a risk of brand dilution in partnerships, a study from the Luxury Institute (which, you have to figure, knows a thing or two about this topic) showed that affluent shoppers are not turned off by luxury brands partnering with mainstream brands.

With specific regard to the Lilly Pulitzer/Target hookup, the Harvard Business Review crunched the numbers and viewed the outcome as purely positive.

“Unlike the market saturation and brand extension strategies that have de-valued other luxury brands like Michael Kors and Coach,” states the HBR’s report, “the Target collaboration was a smart move for Lilly Pulitzer. The limited-item, limited time collection allowed the company to expand the brand while maintaining its exclusive appeal.”

Given the success of the arrangement on almost every count (save, again, that unfortunate website overload), it is more than likely that more collaborations between high-end brands and mainstream retailers are on the horizon. Will there be outcries from those who, holding luxury in high regard, look down their noses at mass-market consumers? It’s likely. But it’s just as likely that such complaints won’t have much an impact on the bottom line.

After all, haters gonna hate.

Or, as Lisa Birnbach put it more eloquently in New York Magazine, Lilly Pulitzer herself “would not have approved of her ‘defenders.’” Referencing the Alexander Theroux quote, “Hypocrisy is the essence of snobbery, but all snobbery is about the problem of belonging,” she concludes that “Pulitzer, despite her last name, was no snob.”

Source: http://www.pymnts.com/news/social-commerce/2015/when-is-luxury-not-luxury/#.VXGbUs9Viko

March 19, 2015

Weak Euro Undermines Chanel’s China Strategy

Marketplace World
By: Adam Allington
March 18, 2015

If you’re thinking about planning a vacation to Europe, now would be a good time. The American dollar is worth more now against the Euro than at any point over the past decade.

While the exchange rate may be welcome news for some tourists, the same may not be said for luxury European brands like Chanel or Gucci. Chanel handbags are so much cheaper in Paris than in China that Chinese tourists are flooding Paris shops for luxury bargains. Chanel want them to buy its handbags in China, expanding its market there.

So Chanel will increase prices in Europe and cut them in Asia.

“I think the Chinese consumer will benefit from this, because they will get lower prices and they won’t have to go shop in New York, London or Paris in order to get the benefit of those relatively lower prices,” says Milton Pedraza of the Luxury Institute.

But high-end brands in particular need to think long and hard about changing prices from country to country.

“One of the keys to running a luxury business is that the customers understand that the prices don’t move all that often, and that you’re not waiting for products to go on sale,” says Stifel analyst David Schick.

Schick says long-term profitability for companies like Chanel or Louis Vuitton won’t hinge on exchange rates, but rather on how they are able to compete in a market that is increasingly crowed with competitors — many of whom are perfectly willing to sell you a handbag online, instead of through a shop on the Champs-Élysées.

Source: http://www.marketplace.org/topics/world/weak-euro-undermines-chanels-china-strategy

March 10, 2015

Generational shift to luxury digital

Data sourced from Luxury Daily; additional content by Warc staff
March 10, 2015

NEW YORK: Affluent consumers in the US prefer to buy luxury goods in store but there is a discernible generational shift taking place as fewer millennials are concerned to shop this way with more inclined to explore options via an app.

A report from The Luxury Institute surveyed wealthy consumers in the US with a minimum household income of $150,000 per year and found that only 40% of millennials wanted especially to shop in store, while 72% would download a branded luxury app.

“There are clear generational differences where the boomers are less digital and millennials are extremely digital,” Milton Pedraza, CEO of The Luxury Institute told Luxury Daily.

“There is no one size all client experience,” he added, “and we have to understand the consumer not as a segment but as one individual, as a human being, in order to build a long-term relationship.”

That said, the differences leapt out in a number of statistics. Overall, 53% of luxury consumers did not download apps, while 47% did so, with most of these being in the younger generations.

Another instance came in social media, where almost two thirds (64%) of wealthy consumers didn’t follow any brands. But among millennials a similar proportion (68%) followed at least one brand and among Gen X the figure was 58%.

But more than one third (38%) of baby boomers also claimed to have downloaded branded luxury apps.

“Boomers are behind in digitalisation, [but] they are by no means not digital,” said Pedraza, “especially the highly educated global traveller.”

The Luxury Institute drew attention to the role of fashion bloggers in reaching and influencing the younger generation.

It found only 15% of boomers followed a fashion blogger compared to 62% of millennials. And followers had made an average of 4.2 purchases from blogger suggestions.

Even if these bloggers can find it difficult to maintain a leading edge position, Luxury Daily observed that their followings can compare favourably with magazines, the traditional influencer in luxury fashion.

The influence of technology is inexorably influencing purchase decisions in some way: 61% of all affluent consumers said it allowed them to make more purchases, while 65% said it was changing the way they shop with luxury brands.

March 9, 2015

68pc of millennials follow luxury brands on social media: report

Luxury Daily
By: Nancy Buckley
March 9, 2015

Consumers are split on their willingness to download luxury brand applications, but when dispersed into generations, 72 percent of millennials are inclined to download a branded app, according to a report from The Luxury Institute.

Digitization of the luxury world is slowly evolving as younger generations grow into being affluent consumers. Luxury clients differ across more than just generations, but understanding the prime and upcoming consumer can prepare marketing teams for the future.

“There is no one size all client experience and we have to understand the consumer not as a segment but as one individual, as a human being, in order to build a long term relationship,” said Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute, New York.

“There are clear generational differences where the boomers are less digital and millennials are extremely digital,” he said. “If you want to look to the people with the most money, you want to cater to the older individual, who are not digital, but as you cater to the digital and the millennials.”

The Luxury Institute has conducted research on consumer attitudes and behaviors by surveying wealthy consumers in the United States with a minimum household income of $150,000 per year.

Technology changes all
Adapting to changes in technology can be difficult, but when looking at statistics, over half of affluents prefer to buy luxury products in-store. However, this number is about 40 percent when it comes to millennials and generation X.

Millennials also change the numbers when it comes to following brands on social media. Sixty-eight percent say they follow one or more brands on social media, while 64 percent of wealthy consumers follow zero brands.

Generation X also follows brands, with 58 percent reporting to follow at least one.

When it comes to brand apps, luxury consumers are about even among those who download and those who do not. Fifty-three percent do not download apps, but 47 percent do. The majority of these consumers are in the younger generations, but 38 percent of baby boomers claim to download branded luxury apps.

“As boomers are behind in digitalization, they are by no means not digital,” Mr. Pedraza said. “Especially the highly educated global traveler.”

When it comes to fashion bloggers, baby boomers are even more separated from the younger population. Fifteen percent of boomers follow a fashion blogger whereas 62 percent of millennials say the same.

These bloggers are having influence upon the luxury consumer with the average of 4.2 purchases made from blogger suggestions among those followers.

Overall, technology is influencing decisions. Sixty-one percent of all affluent consumers believe that technology allows them to make more purchases, and 65 percent report technology changing the way they shop with luxury brands.

Blogging influencers
Since fashion bloggers arrived on the scene about a decade ago, they have gained influence and grown to be leaders in the industry, says a report by Fashionbi.

As these bloggers gained an audience, brands began to partner with them for advertising campaigns, events and other marketing efforts. While it may seem that fashion bloggers are losing their luster, they still have large followings that can rival magazines, creating an opportunity for luxury brands to reach a large, fashion-focused audience (see story).

Department store chains increasingly partner with fashion bloggers to promote new initiatives and publicize their stores.

Fashion bloggers often have a large degree of influence and many followers, making them the ideal spokespeople for high profile marketing campaigns and events. Retailers such as Bergdorf Goodman, Harrods and Bloomingdale’s have recently partnered with a variety of bloggers to promote their products (see story).

Digital is slowly immersing into luxury, and eventually it will alter the consumer’s experience entirely.

“[In the future,] there will be digital aspects that help the sales associate be a far more effective relationship builder,” Mr. Pedraza said.

Source: http://www.luxurydaily.com/68-pc-of-millennials-follow-luxury-brands-on-social-media-report/

January 22, 2015

Luxury Institute Analysis Shows Strong Potential for Firms Serving Wealthy Consumers as Ranks of High-Income Americans Swell to All-Time High

Marketwired
January 21, 2015
By: Luxury Institute

A surge in the number of high-income households signals a source of potential strength for firms selling high-end goods and services, according to a metadata analysis of the Federal Reserve’s 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances by the New York-based Luxury Institute. The number of U.S. families earning at least $150,000 has grown 25% from 10.6 million households in 2010 to 12.8 million 2013, but even as more Americans achieve “high-income” status, luxury merchants still face challenges in turning these high-earners into loyal customers.

Favorable trends in household finances, since 2010, have thus far failed to produce a broad-based rebound in luxury on par with the boom before the Great Recession. Despite rising levels of income, wealth, and recoveries in stocks and real estate to pre-recession levels, many providers of high-end goods and services continue to struggle with sales growth more than six years after the financial crisis that devastated asset values and consumer confidence.

Long memories of the crisis are partly to blame for restrained spending: 30% of consumers from households with at least $150,000 in annual income say that they spend more when their assets appreciate in value, but the wealth effect cuts both ways, and even more deeply when asset values decline. Two-thirds of high-income Americans say that when the value of what they own goes down so does their spending.

In addition, luxury marketers are also facing fundamental shifts in consumer shopping habits brought on by the ubiquity of tablets and smart phones, and the influence of social media.

“Compelling products and extraordinary experiences lead to long-term client relationships in luxury,” says Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza. “Firms thriving today are those with systems and personnel in place to leverage new technologies into smarter ways of communicating and doing business with customers that reflect the new reality.”

Conducted every three years since 1983, the Survey of Consumer Finances provides detailed demographic profiles and insights into household wealth, income, saving, and spending. Since 2004, the Luxury Institute has mined the survey data to identify emerging trends that can impact companies serving a wealthy clientele.

Source: http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/luxury-institute-analysis-shows-strong-potential-firms-serving-wealthy-consumers-as-1985040.htm

October 30, 2014

October 6, 2014

La Jolla among tops in US for luxury home sales

San Diego Source
Daily Transcript Staff Report
October 6, 2014

San Diego is among the top 10 cities with the highest number of luxury home sales, according to a report by Coldwell Banker, with La Jolla high on the list.

San Diego saw the sale of 927 homes valued at $1 million-plus from July 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014. The Luxury Market Report was prepared by the Coldwell Banker Previews International marketing program.

Topping the list was San Francisco with 2,485 luxury homes sold — up nearly 57 percent from the previous year — followed by Los Angeles with 2,170 and New York with 2,145.

The report included three price points: $1 million, $5 million and $10 million.

Two of San Diego’s ZIP codes saw high sales of luxury homes.

La Jolla’s 92037 ZIP code had closings on 348 homes valued at $1 million or more, the third highest of all ZIP codes in the country at that price tier; 269 homes sold in Carmel Valley and Torrey Pines in the 92130 ZIP code.

Four homes valued over $10 million closed in La Jolla, which ranked 16th, the report said. The most $10 million homes, 58, sold in New York.

The U.S. high-end residential real estate market remains strong, with 48 percent of all wealthy consumers indicating they plan to buy a luxury home within the next 12 months, according to the companion survey of wealthy U.S. consumers with a net worth of at least $5 million, conducted by the Coldwell Banker Previews International program and the Luxury Institute.

Younger buyers are the most motivated to buy; an overwhelming 81 percent of affluent people younger than 35 plan to buy a luxury home in the next year.

Source: http://www.sddt.com/News/article.cfm?SourceCode=20141006cze&_t=La+Jolla+among+tops+in+US+for+luxury+home+sales#.VDQEJSldXDQ

October 3, 2014

Luxury market report reveaks newcomers on list of hottest U.S. citie

New Jersey Hills Media Group
October 3, 2014

Quiet, unassuming areas adjacent to traditional luxury markets have rapidly transformed into hotbeds of luxury real estate in the 12-month period from July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014. Leading the way and making its debut in the top 5 U.S. luxury markets for homes valued at $1 million+ is San Jose, where high-end home sales are up a staggering 76 percent from this time last year, according to the Luxury Market Report prepared by the Coldwell Banker Previews International® marketing program.

With Silicon Valley luxury real estate on fire, the affluent enclave of Atherton doubled its sales in the $10 million+ range from 2013. Burlingame, located approximately a mile from tony Hillsborough in Northern California emerged in the $10 million+ list for sold homes for the first time, most likely as the result of low inventory in the Bay Area’s most sought-after ZIP codes.

Adjacency is a powerful trend playing out in high-demand luxury cities well beyond Silicon Valley and the Bay Area, notably in Miami. North Miami Beach made its debut among the top 20 cities for $10 million+ homes sold —signaling that luxury buyers are expanding their horizons beyond the typical hotspots of Miami Beach, South Beach and the private communities of Star and Fisher Islands.

Overall, San Francisco led the nation with the highest number of sales in the $1 million+ category—up nearly 57 percent from this time last year.

The U.S. high-end residential real estate market remains strong, with nearly half (48 percent) of all wealthy consumers indicating that they plan to purchase a luxury home within the next 12 months, according to the companion survey of wealthy U.S. consumers with a net worth of at least $5 million (penta-millionaires) conducted by the Coldwell Banker Previews International® program and the Luxury Institute. Younger buyers are by far the most highly motivated to purchase: An overwhelming 81 percent of affluent individuals under 35 plan to buy a luxury home in the next year.

The survey reveals dramatic generational differences:

Penta-millionaires 35 and under reported the highest average purchase price of all age groups – $7.8 million — and have the largest percentage (80 percent) of all age groups paying all-cash.

By stark contrast, wealthy buyers 45-64 paid an average of $2.7 million for their most recent home purchase while buyers 65 and older spent just $1 million.

The report brought to light strong gender gaps:

Seventy percent of women reported paying all-cash for their most recent property vs. 57 percent of men.

Women reported buying more expensive homes than men:

Twenty-two percent of women spent $10 million or more for their most recent property vs. 13 percent of men in the same wealth bracket.

Forty-six percent of women have plans to buy another home in the coming year, up from 31 percent in 2013.

Location, location, location may no longer be the golden rule of real estate:

With the ability to work remotely now a reality for many, only 25 percent of the under-35 age group indicate that location dominates their search criteria.

Instead, 75 percent say that lifestyle considerations are the No. 1 factor driving their choice of which home to buy.

As evidence of this powerful generational shift, 86 percent of buyers 65 and older say that location remains their top priority.

Hottest In-Demand Amenities:

Nearly one-third of all wealthy buyers under the age of 45 count a “green” or “LEED certified” home as more important than it was 3 years ago.

The trend is also catching on among wealthy buyers of all ages, with 21% saying that they want to buy an eco-friendly home, up from a mere 7 percent in 2013.

As homes become increasingly high-tech, 25 percent now consider a fully automated home a priority.

Thirty-seven percent of respondents under age 35 and 30% of those with a net worth exceeding $10 million will prioritize safe rooms in their next homes.

The full list of the Top 20 Best Performing U.S. Cities in Luxury Real Estate by price points of $1 million+, $5 million+ and $10 million+, and the high-net-worth consumer survey results can be viewed here www.previewslmr.com.

Source: http://newjerseyhills.com/luxury-market-report-reveaks-newcomers-on-list-of-hottest-u/article_44f41eb2-e012-5472-a2fc-1047ab4a0690.html

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