Luxury Institute News

April 26, 2018

For luxury vehicles, electric is no longer a bad word

Star Tribune
By: Hannah Elliot
Thursday April 26, 2018

High-end carmakers see the marketing light in hybrid drivetrains. 

A plug-in power dock made from sustainable materials and designed by French designer Philippe Starck stands next to the 2019 Bentley Bentayga hybrid l
A plug-in power dock made from sustainable materials and designed by French designer Philippe Starck stands next to the 2019 Bentley Bentayga hybrid luxury sports utility vehicle at the 88th Geneva International Motor Show in Geneva.

 

Many Bentley customers believe they have obtained their wealth because of luck.

So says Bentley Motors’ new chairman and chief executive officer, Adrian Hallmark, during an interview in Geneva.

“I have recognized that a lot of our customers follow a similar thing: They are super-successful. And a lot of them think it’s because they’re lucky,” he says. “That’s really important, because they don’t think they’re above human weakness and frailty.”

Such perceived (and believed) good fortune is spurring the world’s millionaires and billionaires to make luxury purchases, based on a system of values such as reduced carbon footprints and sustainability, he adds. According to Hallmark, hybrid and electric cars allow them to express in a novel way, he says.

“There is a new dimension long-term in the purchase decision — the ethical value,” Hallmark says, referring to gleanings from a 2008 internal study Bentley did of the world’s wealthiest people. “Electrification is part of it, and electrification isn’t going away.”

In fact, this new addition to the traditional considerations for buying a luxury car — performance, quality materials and craftsmanship — is manifesting so strongly among the world’s top 1 percent that it is influencing Bentley’s product planning for the next two decades.

The company debuted its Bentayga Hybrid, a mid-six-figure SUV that can run 31 miles on purely electric power, recently at the Geneva Auto Show. (The 5,400-pound SUV isn’t exactly an econobox, but the hybrid badge certainly adds a feeling of green-tinged do-goodery — both for drivers and for onlookers who know what it means.) By 2025, all Bentley cars will offer some version of an electric drivetrain, Hallmark says. That includes its growling 12-cylinder Continental GT line, the latest generation of which is due early next year.

It may take up to a decade to make an electric version of such a car, but the way Hallmark sees it, Bentley has no choice.

“We already know that the [next version] will be a battery electric vehicle,” he says. “It will have all of those moral and ethical benefits with it. By not going that way, even if we don’t have to, we would be massively underperforming in terms of customer potential.”

Of course, the Crewe, England-based brand isn’t the only one to reckon that, in addition to being more efficient, electric power bestows a mark of honor upon its best clients. Top luxury automakers have been producing hybrid and electric vehicles for years, such as BMW’s i8, Porsche’s 918 Spyder Hybrid, and Mercedes-Benz’s sold-out Project 1.

We take it for granted that a fair number of wealthy car buyers admire electric power, thanks to the cool cachet of Tesla Inc. But not long ago, electrics were viewed as anathema by serious car people, who favored traditional air-cooled engines with their guttural roars and grit. Then Toyota’s Prius introduced the modern electric car to a broad audience. That one, with its awkward angles and gutless drivetrain, made electric cars feel like medicine we took with eyes closed and a quick swallow.

“It is definitely high performance with sustainability that resonates on a values and ethics level with affluent and wealthy automotive buyers,” says Milton Pedraza, founder of the Manhattan-based Luxury Institute, which studies trends of the world’s rich.

Witness Porsche’s upcoming Mission E, an electric-powered sedan that the automaker has hyped for years and plans to unveil on the eve of its also much-hyped 70th anniversary. It will probably cost more than the $90,000-plus Panamera, and while its driving range and battery power remains obscured, it will undoubtedly be a car to impress with next year. Among Porsche’s notoriously rabid fans, it will be the only new model that could divert attention from the usual adulation attending icons such as the brand’s GT3, 911R, or 930. More crucial on a broader scale, if Porsche delivers on its promise, it’ll be the first sedan to challenge Tesla’s Model S in terms of sales volume.

Or take Aston Martin Lagonda, which has announced that it’s turning an entire heritage brand, Lagonda, into an electric powerhouse. The wedge-shaped Lagonda Vision Concept that debuted in Geneva is an all-electric sedan that marks how Aston expects the long-extinct brand to look when it returns.

Aston Martin hasn’t divulged many details about the new car, which, after all, is only a conceptual exercise, but Andy Palmer, president and chief executive officer, says it will get 400 miles on one charge — enough to drive from Los Angeles to San Francisco, with self-driving capability and zero emissions.

“The Lagonda Vision Concept is our plan for the rebirth of a great brand,” he says. “It’s a new kind of luxury car.”

Some of the most prestigious brands are holding off on electric for now. McLaren’s global head of sales, Jolyon Nash, recently said no way, not ever (probably). Automobili Lamborghini’s chief engineer, Maurizio Reggiani, says it would take quite a lot of persuasion — maybe an act of God — for the brand to make anything electric in the near future. Bugatti Automobiles SAS’ Stephan Winkelmann, who incidentally came from Lamborghini by way of Audi Sport, said “it’s too early to talk about” electrification at Bugatti, though he recognizes the potential.

“We are not influencing this discussion, but we take this very seriously,” he says. “It’s something to look into.”

Stephanie Brinley, senior analyst for IHS Markit, takes it all with a grain of salt. Some of the “ethical value” status symbol talk is hopeful thinking and marketing, she says. After all, car companies have invested billions in electrification; they have a lot riding on their ability to sell the story that a massive, expensive hybrid SUV is cool, not just “eco-friendly.”

Still, the automakers are on to something real, she adds, that’s not going away. Young drivers are going to care about sustainable and ethical transportation in the next decade — more than any buying group ever has, especially when it comes to aspirational brands.

“If you look at millennials or the younger generation, there does seem to be more thoughtfulness about what kind of mark you leave on the planet — more so than a decade ago,” Brinley says. “As we move forward in the luxury landscape, for this type of buyer, having one in your garage will be crucial.”

For automakers, at least, it’ll take more than luck to get them there.

 

SOURCE: http://www.startribune.com/for-luxury-vehicles-electric-is-no-longer-a-bad-word/480936511/

April 12, 2018

When Marketing Luxury Vehicles, ‘Electric’ Is No Longer a Bad Word

Bloomberg Pursuits
By: Hannah Elliott
Thursday, April 11, 2018

Feeling good about your car is the new feeling cool about your car.


Inside the 2019 Bentley Bentayga Hybrid SUV at the Geneva Motor Show. By 2025, all Bentley cars will offer some version of an electric drivetrain, executives say. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

Many Bentley customers believe they have obtained their wealth because of luck.

So says Bentley Motors Ltd.’s new chairman and chief executive officer, Adrian Hallmark, during an interview in Geneva.

“I have recognized that a lot of our customers follow a similar thing: They are super-successful. And a lot of them think it’s because they’re lucky,” he says. “That’s really important, because they don’t think they’re above human weakness and frailty.”

Such perceived (and believed) good fortune is spurring the world’s millionaires and billionaires to make luxury purchases, based on a system of values such as reduced carbon footprints and sustainability, he adds. According to Hallmark, hybrid and electric cars allow them to express in a novel way, he says.

“There is a new dimension long-term in the purchase decision—the ethical value,” Hallmark says, referring to gleanings from a 2008 internal study Bentley did of the world’s wealthiest people. “Electrification is part of it, and electrification isn’t going away.”

In fact, this new addition to the traditional considerations for buying a luxury car—performance, quality materials, and craftsmanship—is manifesting so strongly among the world’s top 1 percent that it is influencing Bentley’s product planning for the next two decades.

The company debuted its Bentayga Hybrid, a mid-six-figure SUV that can run 31 miles on purely electric power, last month at the Geneva Auto Show. (The 5,400-pound SUV isn’t exactly an econobox, but the hybrid badge certainly adds a feeling of green-tinged do-goodery—both for drivers and for onlookers who know what it means.) By 2025, all Bentley cars will offer some version of an electric drivetrain, Hallmark says. That includes its growling 12-cylinder Continental GT line, the latest generation of which is due out early next year.

It may take up to a decade to make an electric version of such a car, but the way Hallmark sees it, Bentley has no choice.

“We already know that the [next version] will be a battery electric vehicle,” he says. “It will have all of those moral and ethical benefits with it. By not going that way, even if we don’t have to, we would be massively under-performing in terms of customer potential.”

Successful—and Enlightened

Of course, the Crewe, England-based brand isn’t the only one to reckon that, in addition to being more efficient, electric power bestows a mark of honor upon its best clients. Top luxury automakers have been producing hybrid and electric vehicles for years, such as Bayerische Motoren Werke AG’s i8, Porsche AG’s 918 Spyder Hybrid, and Mercedes-Benz AG’s sold-out Project 1.

We take it for granted that a fair number of wealthy car buyers admire electric power, thanks to the cool cachet of Tesla Inc. But not long ago, electrics were viewed as anathema by serious car people, who favored traditional air-cooled engines with their guttural roars and grit. Then Toyota Motor Corp.’s Prius introduced the modern electric car to a broad audience. That one, with its awkward angles and gutless drive train, made electric cars feel like medicine we took with eyes closed and a quick swallow.

The few electrics that did get car fanatics excited were rather fragile, million-dollar hypercar one-offs that spent more time in the garage than on the road. These days, well-heeled buyers consider a hybrid or plug-in vehicle a crucial part of a well-rounded garage.

“It is definitely high-performance with sustainability that resonates on a values and ethics level … with affluent and wealthy automotive buyers,” says Milton Pedraza, founder of the Manhattan-based Luxury Institute, which studies trends of the world’s rich.

Witness Porsche’s upcoming Mission E, an electric-powered sedan that the automaker has hyped for years and plans to unveil on the eve of its also much-hyped 70th anniversary. It will probably cost more than the $90,000-plus Panamera, and while its driving range and battery power remains obscured, it will undoubtedly be a car to impress with next year. Among Porsche’s notoriously rabid fans, it will be the only new model that could divert attention from the usual adulation attending icons such as the brand’s GT3, 911R, or 930. More crucial on a broader scale, if Porsche delivers on its promise, it’ll be the first sedan to challenge Tesla’s Model S in terms of sales volume.

Or take Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd., which has announced it’s turning an entire heritage brand, Lagonda, into an electric powerhouse. The wedge-shaped Lagonda Vision Concept that debuted in Geneva is an all-electric sedan that marks how Aston expects the long-extinct brand to look when it returns.

Aston Martin hasn’t divulged many details about the new car, which, after all, is only a conceptual exercise, but Andy Palmer, president and chief executive officer of Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd., says it will get 400 miles on one charge—enough to drive from Los Angeles to San Francisco in one sitting, with self-driving capability and zero emissions.

“The Lagonda Vision Concept is our plan for the rebirth of a great brand,” he says. “It’s a new kind of luxury car.”

The New Future

Some of the most prestigious brands are holding off on electric for now. McLaren’s Global Head of Sales, Jolyon Nash, recently said no way, not ever (probably). Automobili Lamborghini SpA’s chief engineer, Maurizio Reggiani, says it would take quite a lot of persuasion—maybe an act of God—for the brand to make anything electric in the near future. Bugatti Automobiles SAS’s Stephan Winkelmann, who incidentally came from Lamborghini by way of Audi Sport, said “it’s too early to talk about” electrification at Bugatti, though he recognizes the potential.

“We are not influencing this discussion, but we take this very seriously,” he says. “It’s something to look into.”

Stephanie Brinley, senior analyst for IHS Markit, takes it all with a grain of salt. Some of the “ethical value” status symbol talk is hopeful thinking and marketing, she says. After all, car companies have invested billions in electrification; they have a lot riding on their ability to sell the story that a massive, expensive hybrid SUV is cool, not just “eco-friendly.” (Because, let’s be honest, if you wanted to really reduce your carbon footprint, the answer would be to buy a cheap, tiny electric car, or ride a motorcycle—or a bike.)

Still, the automakers are on to something real, she adds, that’s not going away. Young drivers are going to care about sustainable and ethical transportation in the next decade—more than any buying group ever has, especially when it comes to aspirational brands.

“If you look at millennials or the younger generation, there does seem to be more thoughtfulness about what kind of mark you leave on the planet—more so than a decade ago,” Brinley says. “As we move forward in the luxury landscape, for this type of buyer, having one in your garage will be crucial.”

For automakers, at least, it’ll take more than luck to get them there.

 

SOURCE: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-11/when-marketing-luxury-vehicles-electric-is-no-longer-a-bad-word

 

 

April 5, 2018

7 Complaints of Successful Luxury Salespeople

CEPro
By: Jason Knight
Wednesday, April 4, 2018

 

Change these seven problems, from spending too much energy on social media to altering product lines, and boost sales by 30%, according to the Luxury Institute.

 

7 Complaints of Successful Luxury Salespeople
New York’s Luxury Institute finds sales training to be a waste, and product discounts are ineffective on high-end clientele. 

 

Has any integrator playing in the high-end luxury market ever wondered why one of his or her previously top-performing salespeople suddenly seems to be demotivated and in a sales slump? According to information from the independent New York-based Luxury Institute, it could be something you are doing, not necessarily a problem with the salesperson.

The Luxury Institute recently held “intimate and confidential individual interviews” with top performing in-store sales associates across the spectrum of top-tier luxury and premium brands. The Institute also cross-checked the findings with store managers and retail heads to confirm the results. These top performing associates average more than 12 years of experience, and most perform supervisory roles. They are among the 20 percent of associates who deliver 80 percent of the dollars to top brands, comprising all genders and ethnicities.

The data reveals a “performance-numbing lack of communication” between top-tier luxury brand headquarters and their front-line associates. “The consequences continue to be a significant loss of sales, high employee turnover, poor morale, and most importantly, severed or damaged client relationships,” says the Institute. While the focus of the study was on retail luxury brands, many integrators may be able to relate to these same issues for their own sales teams.

According to the Luxury Institute, luxury employers who adopt these principles will boost their sales by 20 percent to 30 percent.  Here are the seven critical issues that top-performing salespeople say negatively affect their sales performance.

1. Sales Training Is a Waste

Top performers are unanimous on this point, according to the Institute. Successful salespeople learned how to build client relationships from parents and exemplary mentors who inspired in them a passion for living their life purposefully on a daily basis and helping others at work beyond the training tools provided by the brand. They see product and operational training as table stakes. According to these top performers, current sales training is coercive and dehumanizing.

The best associates tell Luxury Institute that they have honed their skills mostly through trial and error, learning to listen without judgment, asking relevant questions, earning trust, and finding creative ways to make individual clients feel cared for and special.

They acknowledge that it took far too long for them to achieve top performance. They want accelerated relationship-building skills for everyone on the sales team, especially for young associates. These young team members have grown up on social media, and the veterans observe that many can’t make eye contact, they lack empathy, and that they are unable to apologize without stating, “I am so sorry you feel that way,” when they make a mistake.

Some top sellers have hired personal coaches at their own expense.

2. Client Feedback Is Often Ignored: Inventory Is Mismanaged

Clients provide constant feedback to the sales associates about products, policies and trends. According to top sales associates, this critical intelligence is rarely collected systematically, or acted upon. One frequently cited example is the constant tweaking, or discontinuance, of timeless staple brands.

Another impediment is inventory mismanagement. VIP clients are often left wanting due to mismanagement of inventory. These destroy customer lifetime value and relationships. Many clients feel betrayed and don’t return.

Top associates say customer attitudes, desires, and behaviors change often. They recommend that these changes be monitored through periodic market research, or by aggregating customer feedback through the voice of the associate. Also, meet with the sales team prior to rolling out any new product offering.

3. Stop Spamming Clients With Emails

Top sales associates earn trust with top clients by committing to them that they will not be spammed by emails or contacted excessively. But salespeople complain their clients are sent waves of “irrelevant, impersonal emails and other communications,” even though the campaigns are often well-intentioned and well-executed.

Associates say they prefer to keep their frayed, outdated black books, and protect their relationships, rather than enter the information into the database and lose a great client. The result is a massive loss of a critical asset in the era of Big Data. Even more damaging, when a client loses trust, the impact on sales is negative and too often permanent.

The best sales associates suggest using a CRM specialist who understands that personal, measured, humanistic communication is required to build a long-lasting client relationship.

4. Stop Discounting Products/Services

One of the greatest annoyances for both clients and sales associates are inconsistencies regarding product pricing. When clients see products or services for which they paid full price available later for a lower price, they revolt and demand make-goods. The wealthiest clients are particularly vocal, based on principle.

Pricing inconsistencies makes clients hesitant to buy at full price. It also allows sales associates, who want to stay in the client’s good graces, to encourage clients to wait until the products go on sale. Those, according to the top performers, are the games they are forced to play, which adversely affect their credibility and their earnings.

They suggest offering more exclusive products for their own channels, and offering classic, heritage, and signature products that never go on sale. Providing early access to very limited-edition exclusives is not only a more profitable way to engage VIP clients than early access to promotions, it is also a more meaningful way to connect with them. Top associates are happy to let marketing communicate sales and promotions. They would prefer to have the inside scoop topics to talk about.

5. Keep Technology Up to Date

Top performers say it’s a big positive to have “wow factor” in a showroom, but it needs to be kept up to date. That same message goes for the back-end systems, such as inventory management. Even things like making sure the Wi-Fi in the showroom is fast and accessible are a plus. If your showroom Wi-Fi is slow, what do you think a customer will think about the system you can install in their home?

6. Social Media Hurts Local Marketing Initiatives

Top sales associates are active personally and professionally on social media. Many of them post to Instagram almost daily and appreciate that some of their clients stay in touch, albeit lightly, on Facebook and Twitter. However, they report, and the research bears out, that the wealthiest and highest potential clients are less active on social media than aspirational consumers, and are becoming even less so as they become more fearful of the potential damage to their identity, reputation, and privacy.

Wealthy clients have far more to lose in a social media environment where the evidence now shows that their data lacks any protection.

According to top associates, marketing has failed to get the message. They want more funds for customized gifting, rewarding special clients, and creating personalized and exclusive client events. They are happy to be held accountable for the return on investment required to fund those programs and invite marketing to be a part of the brainstorming, execution, and measurement.

7. Offer Flexible Schedules

Calling working schedules “dehumanizing” and “stuck in the Industrial Age,” the study says employers need to be flexible in both scheduling and compensation. Top sales associates who pay for themselves in multiples want flexible schedules and compensation to maximize productivity. For example, part-timers can be some of the most productive sales associates.

 

Source: https://www.cepro.com/article/7_complaints_of_successful_luxury_salespeople

February 28, 2018

5 Brands That Reveal The Future Of Luxury Online

Forbes
Pamela M. Danziger
February 26, 2018


Badgley Mischka New York Fashion Week runway app

 

Online is the next frontier for luxury brands. It’s where luxury brands can find their next path to growth, but for a variety of reasons they have been notoriously slow to follow it. As an industry steeped in heritage and tradition, change doesn’t come naturally to it, but in today’s dynamically changing consumer market, that is exactly what luxury brands must do.

While luxury brands have accepted that they must market online, they have been much slower to accept that they must sell there as well. That remains its stumbling block.

“A big part of luxury brands’ hesitance to embrace sales online has been how to keep that luxury aspect of the brand, if it is so easily available,” says Lori Mitchell-Keller, Global General Manager, Consumer Industries at SAP. “Keeping that perceived cache of luxury in the online world have made them slow to migrate there.”

But migrate sales online is what they have to do for assure a prosperous future. Bain & Company recently reported online luxury sales growth is phenomenal, increasing by 24% in 2017. Yet it still accounts for only 9% of the total personal luxury goods market worldwide.

On the surface online’s less than 10% market share might not seem compelling, but the industry’s perception may not match the consumers’ reality. Compare that meager market share with luxury consumers’ preferences in where they like to shop and a totally different picture emerges.

In a global survey of affluent consumers with annual incomes of $150,000 per year, or equivalent, the Luxury Institute found that 21% of those surveyed prefer to shop luxury online, and another 27% had no preference between online or in-store shopping. Just shy of a majority of luxury consumers don’t shy away from doing so online, rather they actively embrace it.

“Luxury brands will lose share if they are not able to interact in the way the world is changing and the way customers want to interact with them,” Mitchell-Keller maintains .

While heritage luxury brands drag their feet, plenty of others are jumping in unburdened by fears of losing their luxe on the internet. “We are seeing a lot of luxury brands being created online, companies like Farfetch, Net-a-Porter, Bonobos, that have much more of an online than physical presence,” Mitchell-Keller says. “And other more traditional brands, like Badgley Mischka and Gucci, have figured out how to create, maintain, even enhance their luxe cache online. There is no secret or easy answer how they’ve been able to do that, but it can and is being done.”

Two of these born on the internet brands, she notes, have recently been acquired by other companies – Yoox Net-a-Porter by Richemont and Bonobos by Walmart – and Farfetch has just signed deals with Fendi, Burberry and Chanel in advance of an expected IPO in NYC this coming November.

Such deals are expected to pick up in the future, as Mitchell-Keller explains, “The main reason physical luxury brands are acquiring digital brands is because they haven’t figure out the online equation yet. They are looking for help to reach the digital customer.”

Putting our heads together, we think these 5 brands best exemplify the future of luxury online.

Farfetch goes further

Founded in 2008 as a online luxury fashion platform, Farfetch is seamlessly blending in-store access to fashions across the globe with internet convenience. With offices in 11 fashion hubs, from which it offers same-day express delivery, it lists products from over 700 boutiques and fashion brands. It carries a multitude of heritage and emerging designer brands, including Dolce & Gabbana, Givenchy and Chloé.

Having acquired the London-based Browns boutique in 2015, it used that platform to introduce its technology-enhanced “Store of the Future” concept that marries the digital and personal experience luxury shoppers desire.

Given its chops in digital luxury marketing, Farfetch also initiated a white label digital service called “Farfetch Black and White” for brands that want to use its platform to power their own branded online presence.

Numerous heritage brands are coming on board in one way or another, including Burberry to list all inventory in its marketplace, Fendi for customized handbags, Gucci for 90-minute delivery service, and most recently Chanel.

But tellingly, Chanel was quick to point out that its Farfetch partnership will not include selling fashion online, rather using its proprietary in-store technology for physical retail. “We are not starting to sell Chanel on the Farfetch marketplace – I want to be very clear on that,” said Chanel’s president of fashion Bruno Pavlovky in announcing the deal. To which Mitchell-Keller asks, “How much share will they lose while they are trying to figure online out?”

Such reluctance to embrace full-on digital access for customers is indicative of an industry attitude that has to change to ensure a vibrant future. It is ridiculous for a brand like Chanel to force its 21st customers to shop like they did back in the 80s.

Net-a-Porter brings it

Just acquired by Richemont following a merger with YOOX in 2015, Net-a-Porter founded in 2000 takes a more heavily content-driven strategy than its closest competitor, Farfetch. But like Farfetch it offers white label digital support to designer brands through its YNAP platform which Richemont says will continue to operate as a separate entity. Nonetheless, it will make strange bedfellows, since YNAP operates flagship online stores for many competitive Kering brands, including Bottega Veneta, Balenciaga, and YSL.

While Mitchell-Keller admires Net-a-Porter, she thinks its Outnet website that offers discounted fashions in flash-sale format is especially in tune with how the next generation wants to shop. “My son, who is totally a millennial, had me logon to order a pair of gold Nike shoes, which I understand are status items for the college crowd. So here we are logged in at midnight for the countdown and find out we are #500 in line to order. It is such a different experience than I am used to where luxury brands pamper you in the store, but millennials don’t necessarily want that. They want this,” she says.

Outnet makes it fun for millennials. It is fast, it’s limited, it’s accessible and it’s cheaper.

Bonobos shows men how to wear it

Bonobos is one of those born on the internet luxury brands, or near-luxury for those who want to quibble, that have captured the loyalty of affluent men shoppers, a hard demographic to attract into the store. It’s achieved that by not just selling clothes, but showing men how to dress fashionably. It is also helped by offering casual-luxe styles that modern men favor.

“I’m intrigued by the way Bonobos shows their clothes,” says Mitchell-Keller. “It’s not just a guy standing there like on most websites. You can see the movement and men interacting with each other. It is a much different experience than just going online and seeing picture after picture of clothes. It’s engaging.”

As a result, Bonobos caught the eye of a big company suitor, Walmart, which acquired the company last year, and with it a thought-leader in the next generation of retail fashion, Andy Dunn who joins another ecommerce powerhouse, Marc Lore, at Walmart to give it a leg up into new internet markets.

While Walmart just announced that its recent quarterly online sales growth slowed, up only 23% compared to a year ago vs. the 50% growth enjoyed throughout the first nine months of the year, it continues to project a 40% uptick through the rest of the year, with Bonobos and a recently announced online partnership with Lord & Taylor showing that this low-end leader aspires to reach higher.

Badgley Mischka dress its models with tech

While the Badgley Mischka brand has long maintained a vibrant online ecommerce presence, co-owner and co-designer James Mischka is described by Mitchell-Keller as a “technology geek.” Being as attuned to tech as fashion, he partnered with SAP to create a runway app for the recent New York Fashion Week where those in the audience could vote on each look as it walked down the runway. “In 9 minutes they got feedback that usually takes them 6 months to get,” she says.

The results were eye opening for the company which discovered that a dress they hadn’t thought would make much of a splash turned out to be the #2 most popular look, allowing the company to place sufficient orders to get it into the stores in record time.

The audience in turn loved the ability to get all the fashion details on their phones instantaneously. The models loved it, who were back stage reading the results and competing to see whose look scored highest. And the other designers at show were envious and lined up afterwards to get an app for their next runway show.

Thinking about new ways consumers can interact and engage with a luxury brand is what makes Badgley Mischka an important luxury brand for the future. “Too many luxury brands aren’t thinking about the technology. They are thinking about product, which is important, but they have to understand how their brand is being consumed differently than it used to be consumed,” Mitchell-Keller notes.

Gucci breaks out of the luxury culture

And we can’t finish our look at luxury online without mentioning Gucci. In an interview on CNBC,  Kering’s chairman and CEO Francois-Henri Pinault said its Gucci brand is doing about 50% of its sales with millennials. In recognition of its online success, L2 Research, which specializes in data-driven analysis, gave its top spot for best performing digital fashion brand to Gucci in 2016 and 2017.

I’ve written extensively about Gucci here, but suffice to say that Gucci’s success online is thanks to Gucci’s CEO Marco Bizzarri giving free reign to its young creative director Alessandro Michele, who understands how to connect with this digitally-native generation. Thus Gucci has broken out of the inbred, digitally-adverse culture that plagues so many other luxury brands.

In conclusion, Mitchell-Keller and I see a whole digital transformation that is going to happen in luxury, just as it has happened in other markets. While we recognize that the experience of in-store shopping, and the pampering luxury consumers can find there, isn’t going to be replaced by digital engagement, customers today value the luxury of convenience that online delivers too.

“The time issue is a huge one,” Mitchell-Keller concludes. “It’s not just that everyone is now on social media. Everybody also has huge demands on their time. It’s a very different world than 20 years ago when these brands started to become popular. Luxury brands have to adapt to the way that consumers want to interact with their product now, and that increasingly is going to be online.”

 

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/pamdanziger/2018/02/26/5-brands-that-reveal-the-future-of-luxury-online/#32f21d5c3c7e

 

January 11, 2018

Data Feed: December 15, 2017

Key stats you need to know about today

eMarketer
By: Rahul Chadh
December 15, 2017

 

Net Neutrality Nixed: The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to end net neutrality regulations that prevented businesses from charging higher prices for better quality content and services delivered over the internet. The action will also end the designation of high-speed internet as a utility. The change was protested by consumer advocates and heralded by those opposed to government regulation.

Social Disconnect: A new report by Common Sense and SurveyMonkey polled parents and teens in the US about the use of social media. It found that more than half of parents thought they were well-versed in their teens’ social media behavior, but only 30% of teens thought their parents were up to speed. In addition, more than one-quarter of parents said they used a tracking or other type of monitoring device to keep tabs on their teens’ online behavior.

Year in Search: Google has released its year-end review of search, reporting that Hurricane Irma was the top trending query in 2017. The iPhone 8 and iPhone X finished second and third, respectively, underscoring the strong hold Apple still has on the collective consciousness. The top 5 was rounded out by former TV host Matt Lauer and soon-to-be royal bride Meghan Markle.

Down with OTT: Video ad serving platform SpotX reported that 26% of ad spending on its platform in October 2017 was dedicated to over-the-top (OTT) video. That was up from just 8% a year ago. SpotX also expects OTT video to command around 30% of ad dollars spent on its platform by the end of the year.

Premium Plays: According to Freewheel, ad views for premium video content in the US increased by 24% year over year in Q3 2017. Video content featuring full show episodes saw the largest bump, while ad views for live streaming of linear broadcasts posted a smaller gain.

State of Luxury: A survey of affluent consumers across the world from Luxury Institute found that more than nine in 10 respondents expect to purchase luxury services or items in the coming year. And more than one-quarter think they’ll spend more on luxury in 2018 than they did in 2017. Only 9% expected to shrink their luxury spending next year.

 

Source: https://www.emarketer.com/content/data-feed-december-15-2017

 

November 27, 2017

Multichannel and Millennial Tastes will Shape Luxury in 2018

The Luxury Institute’s annual list of the “Top 10 Luxury Trends for 2018″ found that millennials are opting for high-end services which provide experiences over purchasing luxury goods.

Luxury Society by Digital Luxury Group
By: Danny Parisi
November 14, 2017

While luxury goods are likely to see a bit of a slump in 2018, high-end services will witness solid growth at the behest of millennials who value experiences over things.

This trend is one of the 10 collected in the Luxury Institute‘s “Top 10 Luxury Trends for 2018,” an annual list of the biggest trends, challenges and predictions for the upcoming year. In addition to the primacy of experiences over goods, luxury brands are focusing more on the emotional benefits their products can have for customers over the material benefits.

Luxury trends

In the coming year the luxury world will be facing some major challenges as well as some major opportunities.

According to Luxury Institute’s Top 10 Trends, growth has been uneven for luxury goods but luxury services are faring much better.

This can be attributed to the growing presence of millennials in the luxury consumer base, who are more prone to purchase services and ephemeral experiences over objects and goods.

Millennials make up a much larger segment of consumers than baby boomers, 92 million to 77 million to be exact, but it will still be a while before millennials fully come into their spending power. For now, they do not have quite as much impact on the market as boomers.

Along those lines, Luxury Institute notes that the impending transfer of wealth from boomers to millennials may still be a ways off, and that when it happens it may not be the windfall many are expecting it to be.

One of the more surprising trends is that shopping centers are becoming more important to the luxury industry.

Shopping malls are not usually considered centers of luxury retail, but recent research shows that mall owners are pouring money into redesigns and renovations to be more accommodating to different types of consumers and communities.

Over the last three years, malls in the United States have poured more than $8 billion into renovations with an eye on turning the mall experience into something more upscale with options beyond the usual shopping mall fare. This research comes from real estate management and investment firm JLL in a report outlining the future of the new U.S. mall.

Relying on data

Other trends on the list focus on the ways the luxury industry is connecting online to offline.

While ecommerce accounted for almost 12 percent of all retail last year, there are signs that a plateau may be on the horizon. In response to this, luxury brands will begin to focus on the in-store experience as well as the online experience, bringing those two together for good.

This theme is continued in another trend where brands will begin to seamlessly integrate the various channels that make up their business in order to allow customers to navigate and complete transactions in whatever way they choose.

While digital is a vital aspect of retail, in-store associates are not useless and are proving to be an essential part of the customer experience, according to consumers.

A report from Astound Commerce shows that 52 percent of consumers think it is vital for store associates to be able to place an order and 46 percent believe they should have access to inventory information. However, online shoppers are having extremely positive experiences as well, with 86 percent claim their customer service interactions were great, and 42 percent saying excellent.

Finally, the next year will likely see new developments in the way brands collect and use data, bringing in new tech such as artificial intelligence to help intelligently sort through and make the best use of valuable data that will help brands market and sell better.

 

Article originally posted on Luxury Daily.

Sourcehttps://www.luxurysociety.com/en/articles/2017/11/multichannel-and-millennial-tastes-will-shape-luxury-2018-luxury-institute/?utm_source=Luxury+Society+Newsletter&utm_campaign=6fa6d0ff3c-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_11_20&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_d63682bcfa-6fa6d0ff3c-61061965

Top 10 Luxury Brands in the World

Stock Talk Review
By: Maria Mancic
November 22, 2017

Photo Source: Pixabay/Public Domain

When someone mentions top 10 luxury brands in the world, what is the first name that crosses your mind?

There is something very appealing about luxury brand items. It might be the fact that they are unreachable for some people or, for some others, the fact that, unlike other mortals, they can afford them. The problem with the most luxury brand items is that the price doesn’t always match the quality, which means that a person is giving a fortune for something that can be bought for, in some cases, less than $200 and it lasts shorter than the one that they would buy for the more reasonable price. But the one thing is certain: as long as there are people who would give that kind of money, the prices will be that high.

Just in one year, in 2016, the global luxury market grew by 3% to extraordinary $240.47 billion. Do you still breathe? Great, let’s continue. Luxury Institute CEO suggests that this growth is caused by an economic slowdown in China, but you will read about that a bit later.

The majority of these top 10 luxury brands in the world are located in Europe. At the beginning of 2017, experts suggested that the luxury market will grow by 4%-6% more by the end of the year and reach incredible $268 billion value. But there are several factors that might slow down this process. One of them is the increasing market awareness and changing conditions that will force luxury brands to open low-cost stores in Asia and it is predicted that, in the next 5 to 10 years, the prominent luxury customer base will come from Africa. The other thing that will affect the luxury market is Trump’s new rules, especially the one regarding making all luxury brand owners to pull their offices from other parts of the world and concentrate on the US only. This will bring the prices up in no time and decrease the owner’s monthly income. Next, it will lead to closing down many stores and firing a lot of people. But, that’s the politics, and people were the ones who chose Trump as their leader.

To clear it up more and find out which luxury brands are on the list, click on top 10 luxury brands in the world.

 

Sourcehttps://www.stocktalkreview.com/top-10-luxury-brands-in-the-world/23357/

September 14, 2017

Nordstrom’s plan to attract shoppers: Wine, manicures — but no merchandise

The Washington Post
September 12, 2017
By: Abha Bhattarai

 


The first Nordstrom Local is scheduled to open next month in Los Angeles. (Courtesy of Nordstrom)

Nordstrom’s newest store will have personal stylists, manicurists, a tailor and plenty of wine.

But there won’t be any merchandise for sale. No clothing, no shoes, no accessories.

Instead, Nordstrom Local will serve as a gathering ground for customers to chat with employees, pick up online orders and drop off returns. Stylists will be available to put together personalized recommendations — outfits for a Caribbean vacation, say, or a job interview — that customers can view on their mobile phones and buy directly from Nordstrom.com.

The experiment, which begins with a 3,000-square-foot store in Los Angeles next month, comes as retailers around the country look for ways to blur the line between shopping online and in stores. Analysts say it is also a way for Nordstrom to open smaller locations in more urban areas to keep up with changing customer preferences. (A typical Nordstrom store is about 140,000-square-feet — or nearly 50 times the size of the new concept.)

“As retail continues to transform at an unprecedented pace, the one thing we know is that customers value great service, speed and convenience,” Shea Jensen, senior vice president of customer experience for Nordstrom, said in a statement. “Finding new ways to engage with customers on their terms is more important to us now than ever.”

It’s a model others are trying, too. Apple executives on Tuesday said the company’s newest stores have outdoor plazas, boardrooms, forums and workshops, all with one goal in mind: getting people to linger.

“We don’t call them stores anymore, we call them Town Squares,” Angela Ahrendts, head of Apple Retail, said at a company event Tuesday. “They are gathering places.”

It’s a similar idea at Nordstrom, which in 2014 spent $350 million on Trunk Club, the online personal styling service. The company was also an early investor in Bonobos, the men’s e-commerce company that was acquired by Walmart for $310 million earlier this year.

“Nordstrom has never been afraid to try new things, and that’s become especially important in an environment where bricks and mortar is becoming obsolete,” said Ivan Feinseth, an analyst for Tigress Financial Partners. “Most retailers are struggling because they have no identity and can’t connect with customers. Nordstrom is the opposite: It has always been known for a high level of customer service, and now they’re moving further in that direction.”

But some said it’s not immediately clear whether Nordstrom’s new concept will be successful. Among the challenges the company could face: higher shipping costs as it mails more items to customers’ homes, and difficulty winning over shoppers who have become accustomed to shopping from home.

“It’s a mixed bag,” said Milton Pedraza, chief executive of the Luxury Institute, a market research firm. “There are people who like the instant gratification of going to a store, and there are others who like the convenience of ordering from home. This model — well, it kind of gives them neither.”

Nordstrom has been a rare bright spot in the retail industry, as longtime department stores chains like Macy’s, Kohl’s, Sears and J.C. Penney report declining sales and profits, and announce plans to close hundreds of stores. Seattle-based Nordstrom, however, reported that both revenue and same-store sales — a measure of sales at locations open more than a year — were up during the most recent quarter, as more people shopped online and in its stores.

But the company is also facing competition from Amazon.com, which this year is expected to surpass Macy’s as the country’s largest seller of apparel. Amazon has been aggressively building up its clothing and shoes businesses with its own private-label brands and last month completed its $13.7 billion purchase of Whole Foods Market, giving it a network of nearly 500 stores around the country. (Jeffrey P. Bezos, the chief executive and founder of Amazon, owns The Washington Post.)

“That’s the big question on everybody’s minds: How do you create a hybrid between shopping online and in store?” Pedraza said. “Nobody has figured it out just yet, so the stakes are very high.”

“It’s not a slam dunk — it’s not like anybody is saying, ‘Oh my God, what a great idea.’ They should’ve done this years ago,’” Pedraza said. “But it’s an interesting idea. And who knows? Maybe it will work.”

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2017/09/12/nordstroms-plan-to-attract-shoppers-wine-manicures-but-no-merchandise/?utm_term=.18b4f737fdb9 

August 9, 2017

Luxury camping, complete with lobster dinner delivery

CBS Money Watch
By: Irina Ivanova
August 9, 2017

Come August, many families leave the house for camping in the woods or on a beach. But those leery of leaving behind the air conditioning need not forego the natural experience. A newly opened campground in Maine might have just the thing.

Sandy Pines Campground in Kennebunkport has been open less than two months, but its 12 professionally decorated, luxury tents are pretty solidly booked through mid-October, according to a spokeswoman. Those come in addition to the campground’s 320 acres of campsites, lodges and RV hookups.

Each tent measures 450 square feet and comes with heating, air conditioning and a mini-fridge. Travelers also can choose from individualized quirky amenities, like mid-century furniture in one tent and a painting set in another. Rates start at $149 a night before taxes.

Would-be campers should note that dogs are not allowed in the luxury tents, although pets are welcome elsewhere in the park. The glam tents also don’t permit individual barbecuing, but they do offer delivery of a fully cooked lobster dinner right to your tent flap.

sandypines-blixensoasis-bynicolashome.jpg

Blixen’s Oasis, a safari-themed tent designed by Nicola’s Home.

 SANDY PINES CAMPGROUND

 

Glamorous camping, or glamping, has taken off in recent years as the travel industry tries to come up with novel attractions for well-heeled travelers who prefer experiences to things.

“When you have the money, you want to splurge,” said Milton Pedraza, CEO of the Luxury Institute. “Yes, you’ll go out and hike, but you’re going to want to have those luxuries when you come back and when you wake up.”

The Oxford English Dictionary, which added “glamping” in December, defines it as an activity with “accommodation and facilities more luxurious than those associated with traditional camping.”

But the experiences range widely between having a slightly more comfortable sleeping floor and ordering lobster delivered to the tent. Pedraza predicts the less-than-rugged segment of glamping, rather than full-on luxury, will grow the fastest in the coming year. Young families in particular might appreciate camping facilities that are set up with basic amenities, he said.

“They’re pretty spectacular,” camper Katie Latulip told CBS affiliate WGME. “The fact that they’re all equipped with all the amenities that a camper would need to essentially just show up and you know, have a great weekend, is pretty phenomenal.”

sandypines-nauticalnights-ext-bychatfielddesign.jpg

Nautical Nights, a tent by Chattfield Designs, at Sandy Pines.

 DOUGLAS MERRIAM FOR SANDY PINES CAMPGROUND

 

Sandy Pines originally intended to rent two of the tents and sell the other 10, but after “overwhelming interest in the glamping experience,” it’s renting all 12 of them, a co-founder of of the site told Boston.com. For those interested in a more permanent camping experience, the campground also offers mini-cabins for sale, which measure about 650 square feet and sell from $71,000 to $98,000.

The concept of traveling in luxury, of course, is nearly as old as luxury itself. A famous example from medieval Europe is the Field of the Cloth of Gold, a summit in Northern France in 1520 between Henry VIII of England and Francis I of France and their respective retinues. They gathered, ostensibly, to celebrate peace between the two countries, but in reality to see which monarch could throw the more impressive party.

An actual wrestling contest during the summit ended with King Henry as the winner, according to Vice, but the question of who was the more successful glamper remains shrouded in the mists of history. © 2017 CBS Interactive Inc.. All Rights Reserved.

Source: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/glamping-kennebunkport-maine-luxury-camping/

July 28, 2017

THE ROLLS-ROYCE PHANTOM PERSONALIZES OPULENCE

Wired
By: Brett Berk
July 27, 2017

 

 

ROLLS-ROYCE

 

FOR MORE THAN 90 years, the rich, famous, and beautiful have been ferried to their special occasions inside Rolls-Royce Phantoms. The car epitomizes imposing elegance, a status symbol that signals, “I’m loaded, but I’m also very classy.” On Thursday, Rolls-Royce unveiled its newest version of the Phantom, a four-door, $500,000-dollar sedan. The car’s design illustrates the balance Rolls-Royce must strike to make the vehicle feel new, innovative, and personalized—worthy of its half-million-dollar price tag—while also maintaining connection to its storied eight-generation lineage.

The general state of the luxury goods market further complicates things. “Wealthy buyers are placing a strong premium on more emotional and personal priorities: travel, food, adventure, and family,” says Milton Pedraza, CEO of the Luxury Institute, which tracks high-end spenders. The challenge for Rolls is to incorporate those spending behaviors into the car’s design.

Making the vehicle stand out is a matter of throwing wide the suicide doors. “If you said to me, ‘What finally defines this Phantom?’ I’d say, ‘Please step inside,’” says Giles Taylor, Rolls-Royce design director.

The feel is “slightly edgy of its time, but not beholden to its time,” says Taylor. That rules out a Tesla-style giant touchscreen. And the Rolls interior has to feel exclusive, so no replicating the health and wellness monitors that respond to drivers’ moods, which Mercedes installs in top-end models.

Rather, Rolls’ approach is to install something called the “Gallery.” That the feature’s term borrows from museum nomenclature is no accident. The Gallery covers the entire central expanse of the upper dashboard with toughened glass, and carves out a three-dimensional display shelf behind it—72-inches wide and 6-inches in tall. The perfect place to install, well, anything you want. You can’t get much more personalized than that.

The Rolls Royce design team and craftspeople at the company’s British headquarters are standing by with some posh ideas for buyers, should they need them—or they’re happy to create installations from scratch. For instance, the company’s most dignified customers might choose to festoon their Gallery with a family crest laser-etched in platinum; a miniature landscape of an ancestral manse fashioned from Austrian porcelain; an abstract wing rendered in feathers and laser light; or a burst of precious gemstones refracting the aurora borealis.

Automakers love this level of personalization because—surprise!—they command hefty price tags. Rolls expects each new Phantom owner to spend almost $100,000 on individual details alone. The company offers Rolls-Royce staples like book-matched burl walnut veneers and preternaturally smooth animal hides, but also novel options like black pear and grey oak woods, outrageous carpet color palettes, even satin and silk seats. The company sees its Gallery as a new way to enhance its up-sell.

THE INSIDE THAT COUNTS

  • The Real Auto Revolution Is Already Happening—Inside the Car

  • Tomorrow’s Cars Won’t Just Drive Themselves. They’ll Feel Different

  • Prepare Yourself for the Sweet, Sweet Luxury of Riding in a Robocar

Now, personalization isn’t a new concept for cars. Pre-war Rolls-Royces were delivered as a rolling chassis to a coach builder, to fit a custom body. The intro of assembly lines standardized things, but now technology means cars can be given bespoke touches with relative ease. “With the digital production we have now, we can make it very individual, but produced in a high industrial quality,” says Thorsten Franck, an industrial designer commissioned to build Gallery concepts. Well into the 21st century, that process gives the Phantom some continuity.

Here’s the best news for those who can’t drop half-a-mil on a car: In the automotive world, what starts as a high-end option often trickles down to the mass market. Watch out for 3D-printed, dash-adorning, family crests at a dealership near you.

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