Luxury Institute News

June 26, 2014

Flying the Flagship

By: Simon Brooke
Sphere Magazine
June 26, 2014

Those waiting for the long-predicted explosion of luxury retailing onlines are still holding their breath. While some reports have estimated that global online retail sales have increased by as much as 17 per cent a year since 2007, growth in the effete world of luxury goods is nothing like as fast. Having viewed e-commerce with suspicion for many years, several successful brands have dipped a well-manicured toe in the digital waters-many prompted by the success of Net-a-Porter-but most have held back. Miuccia Prada summed up the sector’s attitude to web sales and e-commerce last year when she declared: “We think that, for luxury, it’s not right…Personally, I’m not interested.”

The new area for growth in luxury retailing is still not internet-based-it’s in the streets and shopping centres. Yes, bricks and mortar are back. In the luxury shopping capitals of the world-London, Paris, New York, and increasingly cities such as Shanghai and Dubai-well-established brands alongside up-and-coming names are opening new locations as well as expanding and refurbishing existing stores. Many are making significant investments: Versace, for instance, has recently sold a 20 per cent stake to private equity house Blackstone so that the brand can develop new venues.

“Luxury brands recognize the reality that only at most 10 to 15 per cent of sales are conducted online and the store, adapted for the future, will always be the main channel of customer engagement,” says Milton Pedraza, CEO of New York-based boutique research and consulting firm The Luxury Institute. “There are many cities across the world that present opportunities in growth for luxury brands and they are selectively opening stores there.”

The Italian trade body Fondazione Altagamma estimates that although online luxury shopping rose by 28 per cent last year, compared with 2012, it still only comprised 4.5 per cent of overall global luxury sales, further evidence that the luxury industry prefers “on street” to “online”. In an industry worth $300 billion, an estimated 90 per cent of luxury purchases still take place in stores.

Click the link to read the entire article which includes quotes from Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute: http://edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk/Launch.aspx?EID=915643ec-109b-4ba4-a154-fc2360651b30

June 20, 2014

Real Estate In a Global Consumer Landscape

By: Ginette WrightHomes & Estates
Luxury Living Worldwide Edition 2
A Special Supplement for the Wall Street Journal
June 20, 2014

It is no secret that fine property today trades among an increasingly international circle of clients who appreciate the multi-faceted value of real estate. These world citizens have a truly global perspective and see country boundaries as less meaningful in the search for their desired home experience. After all, one can just as easily enjoy an evening sunset from a balcony in Paris or Miami.

What this means is that clients demand that the reach in the marketing of their home be international in scope. One could argue that all borders are crossed in connecting to buyers online; to an extent that is true. Yet there is an important distinction: trust. Am I more likely to click on a property associated with a company I recognize, whether I consciously acknowledge it or not? Milton Pedraza, CEO of the Luxury Institute, notes: “Luxury brands that offer both expertise and trust and are also recognized for delivering the ultimate in global reach in an extremely relevant and personal category such as real estate have a definite advantage in today’s marketplace.” With a heritage that spans over a century and locations in 48 countries and territories, the Coldwell Banker® brand and the Coldwell Banker Previews International® luxury marketing program are familiar to a vast audience that is interested and engaged in acquiring real estate. Our international marketing, whether online or off, enjoys the halo of our global reputation. In the United States alone, we close over $100 million dollars in luxury real estate each day.*

We also believe in the strength of partnerships with brands that have longevity and heritage similar to our own. To that end, the Wall Street journal is a world-class organization with sophisticated readership in all corners of the world. The Homes & estates publication you are holding will land in the hands of Wall Street journal subscribers in major cities on three continents. It’s an investment we make because we want our clients to have access to every potential buyer anywhere in the world.

There is so much more I’d like to share about the value of the Previews® program and the expertise of our fine associates, but I am limited by the space on this page. Instead, I invite you to enjoy a fine read on Robert A.M. Stern Architects (buying his firm’s new book “designs for living” is also a must) and consider the housing possibilities we’ve included in this magazine. do you see a property that fits your view of living? Since summer is upon many of us throughout the world, we chose to look at the luxury lifestyle from the view of the coastline. After all, few moments are more prized in luxury real estate than the moment when you catch that first glimpse of water from your residence and feel a sense of serenity, knowing that you own this experience—the experience of home.

June 16, 2014

US Internet advertising revenues jump 19pc in Q1: report

By: Joe MacCarthy
Luxury Daily
June 13, 2014

Brands continue to up their digital advertising budgets, according to the Interactive Advertising Bureau.

Internet ad revenues reached $11.6 billion in the first quarter of 2014, compared to $9.6 billion from the year-ago period. While the sharp rise is not all that surprising, the increasingly effective nature of digital ads indicates that revenues will keep climbing at double digit intervals.

“Digital advertising is so much more targeted,” said Milton Pedraza, CEO of The Luxury Institute, New York. “You can now target people so much more finely than you could a few years ago.

“Relatively speaking, the cost is very competitive,” he said. “There’s a tremendous amount of online media that you can tap into.

“It’s just a revolution, a transformation, in advertising.”

Mr. Pedraza is not affiliated with the IAB, but agreed to comment as an industry expert.

The Interactive Advertising Burea was unable to comment. The IAB is comprised of more than 600 media and technology companies that account for selling 86 percent of online advertising in the United States.

Spending spree
Consumers are increasingly dependent on their smartphones, which gives marketers countless opportunities to reach them throughout their daily routines.

Also, since brands continually engage with consumers through social media and other platforms, they can expect a high level of campaign recognition when targeting ads.

Many luxury brands are finding interesting ways to increase click-throughs and post-ad engagement.

For instance, Jaguar of North America leveraged its ongoing British Villains campaign with mobile advertisements on The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and other publications.

Click the link to read the entire article which includes a quote from Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute: http://www.luxurydaily.com/us-internet-advertising-revenues-jump-19pc-in-q1-report/

June 11, 2014

6 luxury marketing trends to watch

By: Marco Muellner
Luxury Daily
June 11, 2014

For luxury marketers, 2014 is predicted to be the year that tips the scales, with more than half of affluent shoppers discovering, actively browsing and shopping for luxury items via digital channels. This evolution is spurred by shoppers who are online to save time, yet remain likely to finish the purchase in-store.

According to an April 2013 Luxury Institute study on the multichannel purchasing habits of United States Internet users with incomes of at least $150,000, 48 percent of respondents sourced information about luxury fashion online via a computer. Yet only about a quarter actually completed the purchase online.

Also, eMarketer found that a whopping 74 percent of purchases researched on mobile devices are completed in-store.

Which brings me to the first trend to watch:

Mobile
We tend to think of mobile consumers as similar to desktop consumers, but on different devices. This is just not true.

Most mobile time, is, well, mobile. Digital marketers have always struggled to predictably drive offline traffic to retail, but data suggests this is changing.

With more than 70 percent of daily Facebook and Twitter users on a mobile device, digital marketers must think mobile-first.

For luxury marketers this is particularly challenging as device constraints and consumer expectations limit the richness of the experience.

But with skill and creativity, many luxury marketers are embracing the constraints without compromising brand promise.

Understanding the purchase intent journey
We have been trying to figure out what makes people buy as long as we have been selling, but it is a fragmented challenge and capturing the data at every step has been impossible.

We have made a lot of progress thanks to companies such as Datalogix and others and, as a result, luxury marketers are on the verge of the next evolution, having almost completely wired the journey.

The key, like most things in our modern world, is the smartphone.

In this next phase of digital marketing, understanding how and why consumers buy will be essential to attracting the next generation of affluent shoppers.

Click the link to read the entire article: http://www.luxurydaily.com/6-luxury-marketing-trends-to-watch/