Luxury Institute News

July 4, 2014

America becomes absolutely fabulous

By: Laura Chesters
The Independent
July 4, 2014

Striding down Fifth Avenue clutching a monogrammed black Gucci leather satchel, François -Henri Pinault stands out among many of the trackpant-clad visitors to America’s most expensive shopping street.

Americans might still be better known for their casual fashions but Mr Pinault, the chief executive of Gucci’s owner, Kering, is betting that the millions of domestic and international tourists who descend on New York each year want to snap up European labels on their shopping sprees.

The Frenchman, who is married to the Mexican-American actress Salma Hayek  and whose family owns more than 40 per cent of the Paris-based luxury goods giant, says: “Over the last few years we have talked about the growth engine of luxury being in Asia – but it is important to remember the size and potential of America.”

According to market research from Bain/Alta­gamma on the luxury goods industry, the Americas actually passed China as the growth leader last year. The researchers estimate that the continent’s luxury goods market will grow 4 per cent, and the US alone is valued at €66bn (£52bn) this year.  Other European brands, including the UK’s Burberry and Mulberry, have also been steadily building up their presence across North America.

Mr Pinault is in the US to visit Kering’s American luxury division, which launched three years ago, and its flagship Gucci store in New York, the biggest in the world.

Kering, which owns 17 luxury brands including Saint Laurent and Christopher Kane, now plans to invest huge sums renovating some of its 180 US stores and expanding into new areas, as well as into Mexico and South America. Sales at it luxury division rose 8 per cent last year.

Mr Pinault is also betting that wealthy Americans are beginning to change their habits.  “The way of life here has been to not dress up, but the US shopper is becoming more sophisticated.”

Sarah Willlersdorf at ­Boston Consulting Group  agrees that the wealthy millionaires and billionaires in the States have traditionally spent their cash on cars and experiences rather than expensive clothes, but that now what BCG calls the “personal goods” sector is about to enter a boom period.

She says: “The aspirational masses here do want to spend on luxury – they want to spend on brands, and it is growing. There is a huge change in the desire to buy brands.”

BCG expects that by 2020 the US will have more than a third of the luxury market and  will still be bigger than China’s high-end sector. Japan will account for 7 per cent and the rest of Asia about 23 per cent of the global luxury market. Milton Pedraza, chief executive of the Luxury Institute, a consultancy, agrees: “There are big opportunities for European luxury brands in the US.”

America already makes up 18 per cent of Kering’s group sales, and Mr Pinault is keen to make sure its brands have the best stores in the best locations across the US – not just in New York, which has always had Sex and the City-style fans of European labels.

Ms Willlersdorf adds: “It is not just about East and West coast. The middle and south are very wealthy. European brands are under-represen-ted, particularly in second-tier cities.”

Click the link to view the entire article which includes a quote from Milton Pedraza, CEO of Luxury Institute: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/analysis-and-features/america-becomes-absolutely-fabulous-9585525.html

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